T92 Howitzer Motor Carriage

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Howitzer Motor Carriage T92
T92-howitzer-motor-carriage-01.png
T92 HMC prototype, circa 1944-45
Specifications
Weight 127,000 lb (58 t)[1]
Length 384 in (9.8 m; 32.0 ft)[1]
Width 133 in (3.4 m; 11.1 ft)[1]
Height 125 in (3.2 m; 10.4 ft)[1]
Crew 8 (Commander, driver, co-driver (5x) gun crew)

Recoil M8 (Hydro-Pneu Constant)[1]
Carriage Pintle[1]
Rate of fire 1 r/min[1]
Maximum firing range 25,255 yd (23.093 km)[1]

Armor 25 mm
Main
armament
240 mm howitzer M1
Engine Ford GAF; 8 cylinder, gasoline
470 hp (350.48 kW)
Power/weight 8.1[2]
Suspension torsion bar[1]
Speed 24 km/h (15 mph)

The 240 mm Howitzer Motor Carriage T92 was a self-propelled howitzer developed by the United States of America during World War II.

History[edit]

A limited production run was ordered in March 1945, and the first test model was finished in July of that year. Total production of the T92 was five.[citation needed]

Description[edit]

The 240 mm M1 howitzer was mounted on a slightly modified Heavy Tank T26E3 (later the "Heavy Tank M26 Pershing") chassis - it used an extra bogie wheel, to bring a total of seven.

Variants[edit]

T93 GMC prototype, circa 1945

A similar vehicle was also built in conjunction with the T92, the 8in Gun Motor Carriage T93. The T93 mounted the longer 8in M1 gun instead of the 240mm howitzer.

Use[edit]

Limited numbers of both 240mm HMC T92s and 8in GMC T93s were going to be used in Operation Downfall, the planned invasion of the Japanese mainland.[citation needed] However, after the Japanese surrender on 14 August 1945, the T92s and T93s were not shipped to the Pacific Theater of Operations.

Preserved vehicles[edit]

A surviving T92 is preserved at the Detroit Arsenal in Warren, MI.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Maj. Gen. Louis E. Hibbs (July 1946). "Report on the field - Artillery conference" (PDF). In Col. Devere Armstrong. The Field Artillery Journal (The United States Field Artillery Association) 36 (7). 
  2. ^ Col. Devere Armstrong, ed. (September 1946). "To the editor" (PDF). The Field Artillery Journal (The United States Field Artillery Association) 36 (9): 549. 

External links[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • R.P. Hunnicutt. Pershing: A History of the Medium Tank T20 Series. ISBN 978-0982190708.