TT69

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Theban Tomb TT69
Burial site of Menna
Location Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, Theban Necropolis
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Menna
in hieroglyphs
Entrance to the tomb of Menna
Detail of painting in the tomb
Detail of painting in the fishing and fowling scene

The Theban Tomb TT69 is located in Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, part of the Theban Necropolis, on the west bank of the Nile, opposite Luxor.[2] It is the burial place of the Ancient Egyptian Menna, who was Scribe of the Fields of the Lord of the Two Lands, probably during the reign of Thutmose IV, in the 18th dynasty.[3]

Layout and decoration[edit]

The tomb is a typical t-shaped nobles' tomb, with a long transverse hall. In the right-hand hall there are typical scenes showing Menna and his wife receiving (or giving) offerings. At the end of this hall there is a stele, showing two men and two women praying. The back wall of this hall shows the funerary feast. The end of the left-hand hall shows Menna and his wife offering to Osiris. The walls of this hall depicts offerings to Menna and then the fields of his heavenly estate, together with the tomb owner on a Chariot, being drawn by a skewbald horse.

The left side of the inner corridor shows funerary scenes, with the deceased voyaging to Abydos and the weighing of his heart. The right hand-side of this corridor shows the typical fishing and fowling scene.

At the end of the corridor is the remains of the statue of Ramose and his wife; the upper parts of the statue has been destroyed.

Damage[edit]

Many of the depictions of Menna has been deliberately damaged, either by having the face removed, the eye gouged out or by having his hands damaged so as not to be hold the items with which he is depicted.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Porter and Moss, Topographical Bibliography: The Theban Necropolis, pg 134-139
  2. ^ Baikie, James (1932). Egyptian Antiquities in the Nile Valley. Methuen. 
  3. ^ Baikie, James (1932). Egyptian Antiquities in the Nile Valley. Methuen. p. 577. 
  4. ^ Baikie, James (1932). Egyptian Antiquities in the Nile Valley. Methuen. p. 578. 

External links[edit]