Ta' Pinu

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Basilica of the Blessed Virgin Of Ta' Pinu
Santwarju tal-Madonna ta' Pinu
Malta Gozo Ta Pinu BW 2011-10-08 10-18-54.JPG
Basic information
Geographic coordinates 36°3′42.4″N 14°12′53.4″E / 36.061778°N 14.214833°E / 36.061778; 14.214833Coordinates: 36°3′42.4″N 14°12′53.4″E / 36.061778°N 14.214833°E / 36.061778; 14.214833
Affiliation Roman Catholic
Province Archdiocese of Malta
District Diocese of Gozo
Year consecrated 31 August 1932
Ecclesiastical or organizational status Minor basilica, National Shrine
Leadership Fr Gerard Buhagiar [1]
Website www.tapinu.org
Architectural description
Architectural type Church
Architectural style Neo-romantic
Direction of façade ESE
Groundbreaking 30 May 1920 (1920-05-30)
Specifications
Length 49 metres (161 ft)
Width 37 metres (121 ft)
Width (nave) 14 metres (46 ft)
Height (max) 61 metres (200 ft)
Church's interior

The National Shrine of the Blessed Virgin of Ta' Pinu (Maltese: Santwarju tal-Madonna ta' Pinu) is a Roman Catholic minor basilica and national shrine located some 700 metres (2,300 ft) from the village of Għarb on the island of Gozo, the sister island of Malta. The church is dedicated to the Blessed Virgin of Ta' Pinu. The basilica is located on the edge of a cliff in open countryside which allows visitors to enjoy beautiful views of the area.

History[edit]

The origins of the Shrine of Our Lady of ta' Pinu are unknown. It was first recorded in the archives of the Curia in Gozo, when the Bishop Domenico Cubelles paid a visit to the chapel. This noted that the chapel had just been rebuilt and that it belonged to the noble family of "The Gentile".[2]

In 1575 the apostolic visitor Pietro Duzina was delegated by Pope Gregory XII to visit the Maltese Islands. In his pastoral visit to the church, he found that it was in a very bad state. He ordered the church to be closed and demolished and its duties passed to the parish church, now the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Gozo. When demolition began the workman broke his arm while striking the first blow. This was taken as an omen that the chapel should not be demolished. The church was the only chapel on the island to survive Duzina's decree ordering the demolition of other similar chapels.[2]

Pinu Gauci became the procurator of the church in 1598 and its name was changed from "Of the Gentile" to "Ta` Pinu", meaning "Of Philip". In 1611 Gauci offered money for its restoration. It was rebuilt, with a stone altar erected and investments for liturgical services provided. Gauci also commissioned the painting of the Assumption of Our Lady for the main altar. This was done in 1619 by Amadeo Perugino.[2]

In 1883, Karmni Grima was walking past the now run down church and heard a voice asking her to recite three Hail Marys'. Over the following years miracles were attributed to the grace of Our Lady of The Assumption to whom the church was dedicated. The works for the new church began on 30 May 1922, to be consecrated on 31 August 1932. It was built in a neo-romantic style. Inside the church there are 6 mosaics, 76 coloured windows and many ex-voto. The bell tower is 61 metres high.[2]

Pope John Paul II celebrated mass on the parvise of the shrine during his visit to the island of Gozo on 26 May 1990.[3] On 18 April 2010, when visiting Malta, Pope Benedict XVI donated and placed a Golden Rose in front of the devotional image of Our Lady Of Ta' Pinu which was brought over from Gozo to Malta for this special occasion. The Pope invited everybody to "Pray to Her Under the Title Queen of the Family"[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]