Ta-Tanisha

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Ta-Tanisha
Born Shirley Cummings
(1953-01-15) January 15, 1953 (age 61)
Bronx, New York, United States
Residence Los Angeles, California, U.S
Other names Ta Ta
Citizenship American
Occupation Actress
Years active 1960-present
Spouse(s) Lee Weaver (since 1971)
Children 1

Ta-Tanisha (born Shirley Cummings on January 15, 1953 in The Bronx, New York) is an American character actress, best known for her role as Pam Simpson on the television series Room 222, which she played from 1970 to 1972.

Ta-Tanisha later appeared in the 1973 film The Sting, and played Lamont Sanford's love interest, Janet Lawson, on Sanford and Son for two episodes before Marlene Clark assumed the role. Ta-Tanisha also appeared on Good Times three times (in three separate roles) as well as on What's Happening!!. Her husband is veteran actor Lee Weaver. Ta-Tanisha and Weaver reside in her hometown Bronx, New York area, They have one child Leis La-Te (daughter).

Early life[edit]

Career[edit]

Ta-Tanisha arrived in Los Angeles from Detroit, Michigan in the sixties. In the early seventies Ta-Tanisha began studying theater at the Performing Arts Society Los Angeles (PASLA) where she performed in several plays including Blues for Mister Charlie and A Raisin in the Sun. Ta-Tanisha also appeared in The Black Girl in Search of God at the Mark Taper Forum.

After a while, Ta Tanisha began to get roles in television shows and motion pictures such as Room 222, in a recurring role as Pam Simpson, Good Times, Sanford & Son and the Mod Squad. She co-starred as a deaf mute on the hit show, Mission: Impossible (1966 TV series) and was nominated for the NAACP Image Award for this performance. Ta-Tanisha was also in the academy award winning movie, The Sting.

This exposure to the production process inspired Ta-Tanisha to create a Media literacy program for inner-city youth, Ta-Tanisha named this program TechniVision and it was presented at a local art center and as an after school program in conjunction with Los Angeles City Schools and Girls, Inc.

Ta-Tanisha received an award from the City of Los Angeles for “helping to heal the city” after the uprising of the early 90’s in the city.

Currently Ta-Tanisha is part of the Repertory Dance Theater of Los Angeles and is part of a team that is conducting an after school performance program. Ta-Tanisha has also written a play about Biddy Mason, an enslaved African American woman who never learned to read or write; Miz Biddy. The play is currently in development. [1]

Personal life[edit]

Since July 10, 1971, Lee Weaver has been married to actress Ta-Tanisha and they have one child together. He and his wife reside in The Bronx, New York, where Ta-Tanisha was born and raised, they have one child Leis La-Te (daughter) [2]

Controversy[edit]

The Real Anger was backstage an article by Budd Schulberg published in Life Magazine Aug 21, 1970. A cover story of the final week of shooting for the 1970 American drama directed by Paul Bogart "Halls of Anger"

"Black extras get $13.20 a day -whites a minimum of $29.15." "Our dressing rooms aren't integrated." Tell'im what they did to Ta-Tanisha." Cal Told me about Ta-Tanisha, the black actress who had protested because she didn't have as nice a dressing room as her white "opposite number," Pat Stich, nor could she use the telephone on the set. To Ta-Ta, Cal said it was the same crap all over again. They can use the phones. We're still in the boondocks." Ta-Ta was so hurt, she broke down and cried, he said. We understood how she felt. She was being treated unfairly." - Budd Schulberg, Life Magazine Aug 21, 1970 [3]

Pat Stich, a well-bred, sensitive young actress, became almost tearful as she talked: "This has been a very strange experience for me. I'm not really over it yet. I came in the first morning looking forward to meeting black actresses I'd be working with. But when I introduced myself, Ta-Ta and the others just stared at me. It was very spooky-I wanted to be friends but they wouldn't let me in. As we worked up to the scene where they tear my clothes off, I heard rumors that I would be in for a surprise that wasn't in the script. I was terrified I went to Mr. Bogart. I'd been nervous about the nude scene anyway. I'm afraid Mr. Bogart got angry with me. He said this was just a scene in a movie, that he'd stage it realistically without letting it get out of control, he'd make that clear to Ta-Ta and the others also. When he finally did the scene a strange thing happened. It didn't come off as violently as it should have. Maybe we'd all been so uptight. Ta-Ta and the black kids seemed to hold back too much. I guess we were all a little self-conscious. If all this was in a movie script, I suppose Ta-Ta and I would make up and there'd be some hope at the end. But it didn't work out that way. To be absolutely frank, after this experience I feel I have to reexamine my attitude toward black people. I don't mean hate them because they gave me a bad time. It's just so much more complex than I had anticipated." - Budd Schulberg, Life Magazine Aug 21, 1970 [3]

Said Ta-Tanisha, "I think if I'd realized what they were putting down, I wouldn't have taken this job. Hollywood isn't ready to treat black people as people. A lot of times I felt like quitting. There's still a double standard. The studio is still Whitey's turf. Then this script I don't think white writers can ever write for blacks. They'll never know how we feel or think or talk. That scene where we we're supposed to strip the white kid in the john. I resented it. That's Whitey's idea of us. Of course, I realize it's box office, but I couldn't believe that line we had to say, "We wanna see if you're blond all over." I can see a fight, with slapping and hair-pulling, but the way it was written it didn't seem true or fair to my people-" Budd Schulberg, Life Magazine Aug 21, 1970 [3]

Cultural references[edit]

In the United States Tanisha it is a predominantly African-American name first popularized in the 1960s by the actress Ta-Tanisha, who appeared on the television program Room 222. Ta-Tanisha loosely translated in Swahili means "Puzzling One".[3]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1995 of the Pentecost, DaysDays of the Pentecost Melena's mother Action/Adventure Musical Road [4]
1991 Whereabouts of Jenny, TheThe Whereabouts of Jenny Scranton's Secretary Drama [5]
1973 Sting, TheThe Sting Louise Coleman Caper film, Comedy, Drama [6]
1973 Stone Killer, TheThe Stone Killer Salesgirl Crime, Action, Drama [7]
1973 the Sensuous Lion, FrasierFrasier the Sensuous Lion Comedy [8]
1970 It Is (1970 film), LikeLike It Is (1970 film) Randy Drama [9]
1970 of Anger, HallsHalls of Anger Claudine Drama [10]

Television film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1971 , Crosscurrent (1971 film)Crosscurrent (1971 film) Rainie Lewis Crime Drama [11]
1977 Choirboys (film), TheThe Choirboys (film) Melissa Comedy Drama [12]
1983 Sister (film), BabyBaby Sister (film) Night Nurse Drama [13]
1982 First Time (1982 film), TheThe First Time (1982 film) Shari Drama [14]
1985 Fairies, StarStar Fairies Nightsong (voice) Animation Fantasy [15]
1987 A Mother's Story, Convicted:Convicted: A Mother's Story Drama [16]
1989 Women of Brewster Place, TheThe Women of Brewster Place Tenant #1 Drama [17]

Television Series[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1969 Squad, ModMod Squad Leora Little Season 2, Episode 7: Confrontation! [18]
1969 222, RoomRoom 222 Pam Arnold Season 1, Episode 13: Seventeen Going on Twenty-Eight [19]
1970 222, RoomRoom 222 Pam Arnold Season 1, Episode 17: Operation Sandpile [20]
1970 222, RoomRoom 222 Pam Simpson Season 2, Episode 7: Only a Rose [21]
1970 222, RoomRoom 222 Pam Arnold Season 2, Episode 8: The Fuzz That Grooved [22]
1970 222, RoomRoom 222 Pam Arnold Season 2, Episode 15: Now, About That Cherry Tree [23]
1970 Bill Cosby Show, TheThe Bill Cosby Show Georgianna Jones Season 2, Episode 4: There Must Be a Party [24]
1970 Impossible, MissionMission Impossible Maryana "Gabby" Renfrow Season 5, Episode 10: Hunted [25] Nominated: NAACP Image Award
1971 222, RoomRoom 222 Pam Simpson Season 2, Episode 20: Hip Hip Hooray [26]
1971 222, RoomRoom 222 Pam Simpson Season 3, Episode 1: K-W-W-H [27]
1971 222, RoomRoom 222 Pam Simpson Season 3, Episode 6: Suitable for Framing [28]
1971 New Dick Van Dyke Show, TheThe New Dick Van Dyke Show Judy Season 1, Episode 3: Mid-term Dinner [29]
1972 222, RoomRoom 222 Pam Simpson Season 3, Episode 18: We Hold These Truths [30]
1972 , MannixMannix Gloria Logan Season 5, Episode 21: Lifeline [31]
1972 Partridge Family, TheThe Partridge Family Mary Lou Trimper Season 3, Episode 10: Ain't Love Grand [32]
1972 , Emergency!Emergency! Rosie Season 2, Episode 16: Syndrome [33]
1973 , Adam-12Adam-12 Lizzie Season 5, Episode 23: Keeping Tabs [34]
1974 , Cannon (TV series)Cannon (TV series) Miranda Season 3, Episode 23: Triangle of Terror [35]
1975 Tanner, LucasLucas Tanner Jean Season 1, Episode 15: What's wrong with Bobby? [36]
1975 and Son, SanfordSanford and Son Janet Lawrence Season 5, Episode 4: The Sanford Arms [37]
1976 and Son, SanfordSanford and Son Janet Lawrence Season 5, Episode 14: Can You Chop This? [38]
1976 Suite, ExecutiveExecutive Suite Melida Season 1, Episode 10: Re: The Sounds of Silence [39]
1976 Happening!!, What'sWhat's Happening!! Patrice Williams Season 1, Episode 10: Puppy Love [40]
1974 Times, GoodGood Times Marcy Season 1, Episode 13: My Son, the Lover [41]
1976 Times, GoodGood Times Mary Ann Season 3, Episode 21: J.J. in Trouble [42]
1979 Times, GoodGood Times Zodiac Girl Season 6, Episode 18: J.J. and T.C. [43]
1980 Jeffersons, TheThe Jeffersons Nurse #3 Season 6, Episode 16: The Arrival: Part 2 [44]
1985 & Lacey, CagneyCagney & Lacey Unknown Season 5, Episode 9: Old Ghosts [45]
1986 Street Blues, HillHill Street Blues Pregnant Lady Season 6, Episode 18: Iced Coffey [46]
1987 , Amen (TV series)Amen (TV series) Mrs. Gordon Season 2, Episode 4: Dueling Ministers [47]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.rdtolarts.org/staff.php
  2. ^ http://www.filmreference.com/film/25/Lee-Weaver.html
  3. ^ a b c d LIFE magazine. Budd Schulberg. Aug 21, 1970. Retrieved July 2014. 
  4. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112812/?ref_=ttfc_fc_tt
  5. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0103245/?ref_=filmo_li_tt
  6. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070735/
  7. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070736/
  8. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070075/?ref_=ttfc_fc_tt
  9. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0163770/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_31
  10. ^ Halls of Anger
  11. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066957/
  12. ^ The Choirboys (film)
  13. ^ Baby Sister (film)
  14. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083945/
  15. ^ Star Fairies
  16. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092782/?ref_=ttfc_fc_tt
  17. ^ The Women of Brewster Place
  18. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0650062/
  19. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0688619/
  20. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1113603/
  21. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1336875/
  22. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0779551/
  23. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1336870/
  24. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1146955/
  25. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0649239/combined
  26. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1336869/
  27. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1340348/
  28. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0688621/
  29. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0659418/
  30. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1340355/
  31. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0641603/
  32. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0670136/
  33. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0570691/
  34. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0505279/
  35. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0536072/
  36. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0637297/?ref_=ttep_ep16
  37. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0694167/
  38. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0694072/
  39. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0801919/
  40. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0746279/
  41. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0590886/
  42. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0590870/
  43. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0590865/
  44. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0614964/
  45. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0535153/
  46. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0601702/
  47. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0511200/

External links[edit]