Tabernash, Colorado

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Tabernash, Colorado
Census-designated place (CDP)
Location in Grand County and the state of Colorado
Location in Grand County and the state of Colorado
Coordinates: 39°59′33″N 105°50′47″W / 39.99250°N 105.84639°W / 39.99250; -105.84639Coordinates: 39°59′33″N 105°50′47″W / 39.99250°N 105.84639°W / 39.99250; -105.84639
Country  United States
State  Colorado
County Grand County[1]
Area
 • Total 4 sq mi (10.5 km2)
 • Land 4 sq mi (10.5 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[1] 8,333 ft (2,540 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 165
 • Density 41.3/sq mi (15.7/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code[2] 80478
Area code(s) 970
FIPS code 08-76190
GNIS feature ID 0180967

Tabernash is a census-designated place (CDP) in Grand County, Colorado, United States. The population was 165 at the 2000 census.[3] The Tabernash Post Office has the ZIP Code 80478.[2]

Geography[edit]

Tabernash is located at 39°59′33″N 105°50′47″W / 39.99250°N 105.84639°W / 39.99250; -105.84639 (39.992614, -105.846522).[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.1 square miles (11 km2), all of it land.

Climate[edit]

This climate type is dominated by the winter season, a long, bitterly cold period with short, clear days, relatively little precipitation mostly in the form of snow, and low humidity. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Tabernash has a subarctic climate, abbreviated "Dfc" on climate maps.[5]

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 165 people, 72 households, and 38 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 40.8 people per square mile (15.7/km²). There were 103 housing units at an average density of 25.5 per square mile (9.8/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.36% White, 1.21% African American, 0.61% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.61% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.82% of the population.

There were 72 households out of which 25.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.2% were married couples living together, 4.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.2% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 24.2% under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 47.3% from 25 to 44, 18.2% from 45 to 64, and 6.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 123.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 140.4 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $40,179, and the median income for a family was $12,411. Males had a median income of $36,250 versus $24,750 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $20,485. About 51.1% of families and 27.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.6% of those under the age of eighteen and 100.0% of those sixty five or over.

1984 airplane crash[edit]

On August 10, 1984, a Cessna L-19 Bird Dog (registration number N4584A) crashed in a forest near Tabernash. The wreck was found by a pair of backpackers more than three years later on August 23, 1987. A 6½ minute video shot from a VHS camcorder mounted on the instrument panel was found at the site. The heavily damaged tape, some of it hanging from tree branches, was recovered and repaired by Colorado deputy sheriff Dale Wood. Subsequent analysis of the footage revealed that the pilot had not taken into account the density altitude conditions that existed on the day of the flight. The aircraft was unable to climb away from steadily rising terrain due to the fact that it was essentially at or above its service ceiling, and in an attempt to remedy the situation, the pilot stalled the airplane three times during a steep bank to the right. The pilot could be heard yelling, "Damn, hang on Ronnie!" to his one backseat passenger moments before impacting the terrain.

The family of the deceased had put a 20-year moratorium (via the FAA) on the release of the film to the general public with the only stipulation that it (at the FAA's request to the family of the deceased) be shown only to flight instructors at conventions and workshops. The moratorium eventually expired and was not renewed, and thus the footage effectively became "public domain."

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ a b "ZIP Code Lookup" (JavaScript/HTML). United States Postal Service. December 14, 2006. Retrieved December 14, 2006. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ Climate summary for Tabernash, Colorado