Tachau and Vought

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Tachau and Vought was an American architectural firm active in the mid-twentieth-century New York City that specialized in mental hygiene hospitals. It was established in 1919 as the successor to the architectural firm of Pitcher and Tachau by William G. Tachau (b. 1875) and Vought. By 1946, Vought had left. Eliot Butler Willauer (April 4, 1912 – February 6, 1972) was a principal from around 1945 until 1946.[1][2][3] The firm moved from 109 Lexington Avenue to 102 East 30th Street around 1923.[4]

Like many New York architectural firms active during the Great Depression, Tachau & Vought worked in “almost continuous employment on Federal, State or City work,” including on Mayor Fiorello LaGaurdia’s list of architects since its inception. “From 1918…[they] specialized in mental hygiene hospitals.”

Works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Nancy L. Todd.[1] New York's Historic Armories: An Illustrated History (Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 2006), p.268
  2. '^ American Architect Directory: 1956 First Edition.[2](R.R. Bowker LLC., 1955), p.606
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Questionnaire for Architects’ Roster and/or Register of Architects Qualified for Federal Public Works"[3](May 20, 1946)
  4. ^ a b c d Office for Metropolitan History, [4] "Manhattan NB Database 1900-1986," (21 Feb 2010)
  5. ^ David Kaufman [5] Shul with a pool
  6. ^ Karen Van Lengen and Lisa Reilly. Vassar College: An Architectural Tour. The Campus Guide Series. (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004), p.80
  7. ^ 369th Regiment Armory
  8. ^ Andrew S. Dolkart and Matthew A. Postal. [6]Guide to New York City Landmarks. Third Edition (Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 2004) p.209.
  9. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission. [7] Designation List 411. (March 24, 2009). p.5
  10. ^ National Register of Historic Places