Taddle Creek

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Taddle Creek
River
Taddle Creek - McCaul's Pond.jpg
Taddle Creek, dammed to create McCaul's Pond, on the University of Toronto campus in 1870
Country Canada
State Ontario
City Toronto
Source
 - location Bathurst Street and St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Mouth
 - location Lake Ontario, just east of Parliament Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Length 6 km (4 mi)

Taddle Creek is a buried stream in Toronto, Ontario, Canada that flowed a southeasterly course about six kilometres long, from the present site of Wychwood Park through the University of Toronto, into the Toronto Harbour near the Distillery District. During the 19th century, it was buried and converted into an underground sewer, but traces of the creek can still be found today. The scenic footpath known as Philosopher's Walk follows the ravine created by the creek from the Royal Ontario Museum to Trinity College.

Taddle Creek is also the name of a Toronto literary magazine.

Taddle Creek had other names during the 19th Century:

  • Little Don River
  • Brewery Creek - named for Enoch Turner’s brewery
  • Goodwin Creek
  • University Creek
  • Wolz Creek - east of Jarvis after brewer Mr. Woltz

The disappearance of the creek came in phases in the 19th century:

  • east of Church Street - before 1860
  • Elizabeth St to Church St - early 1866
  • University of Toronto sections - 1886

Taddle Creek Park[edit]

Taddle Creek Park
TaddleCreekPark jug.jpg
The Vessel by Ilan Sandler
Coordinates 43°40′12″N 79°23′55″W / 43.67000°N 79.39861°W / 43.67000; -79.39861
Created 1976
Operated by Toronto Parks
Website TADDLE CREEK PARK

Taddle Creek Park is a small but busy park at the southwest corner of Lowther Avenue and Bedford Road, in The Annex area of Toronto. The park was created in 1976 on what had been the site of the home of Nobel laureate Frederick Banting.[1] After extensive renovations the park reopened in July 2011, with an avant-garde sculpture centrepiece by Ilan Sandler, created from 4 kilometers of stainless steel rod, the approximate length of Taddle Creek.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alfred Holden. "Peeling Back The Layers". Taddle Creek Magazine. Retrieved February 2012. 
  2. ^ "Public Projects 2011". Ilan Sandler Studio Inc. Retrieved February 2012. 

External links[edit]