Tagetes minuta

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Tagetes minuta
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Tageteae
Genus: Tagetes
Species: T. minuta
Binomial name
Tagetes minuta
L.
Synonyms[1]
  • Tagetes bonariensis Pers.
  • Tagetes glandulifera Schrank
  • Tagetes glandulosa Schrank ex Link
  • Tagetes porophyllum Vell.
  • Tagetes tinctoria Hornsch.

Tagetes minuta, also known as southern cone marigold, stinking roger or black mint,[2] is a tall upright marigold plant from the genus Tagetes, with small flowers, native to the southern half of South America.[3] Since Spanish colonization, it has been introduced around the world, and has become naturalized in Europe, Asia, Australasia, North America, and Africa.[3]

Ocopa
Wakatay
Kawunyira[clarification needed] at Entebbe, Uganda

It is used as a culinary herb in Peru, Ecuador, and parts of Chile and Bolivia. It is called by the Quechua terms Wakatay in Peru[4] or Wakataya in Bolivia.[5] It is commonly sold in Latin grocery stores in a bottled, paste format as black mint paste.

Description[edit]

This species of marigold may grow to become from 0.6–1.3 meters tall.

Uses[edit]

The leaves when dried may be used as a seasoning.

Wakatay paste is used to make the popular Peruvian potato dish called ocopa''.

For some time people have used it as a flavorful herbal tea for medical benefits such as a remedy for the colds, respiratory inflammations, or stomach problems.

It can be used to produce an organic dye (known as Tamidye or TAMI dye) which was developed at Moi University in Kenya under the direction of R. K. Mibey.[6]

Toxicity[edit]

The sap of the plant may cause irritation to the skin and may also cause photodermatitis.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Plant List". 
  2. ^ California Dept. of Food and Agriculture data sheet: Tagetes minuta
  3. ^ a b "USDA GRIN Taxonomy". 
  4. ^ Diccionario Quechua - Español - Quechua, Academía Mayor de la Lengua Quechua, Gobierno Regional Cusco, Cusco 2005 (Quechua-Spanish dictionary)
  5. ^ Teofilo Laime Ajacopa, Diccionario Bilingüe Iskay simipi yuyayk'ancha, La Paz, 2007 (Quechua-Spanish dictionary)
  6. ^ Too, Titus (February 1, 2012). "Varsity breaks ground with dye made from weed". The Standard. Retrieved 18 August 2012. 

Sources and external links[edit]