Taghmon

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Taghmon
Teach Munna
Town
Taghmon is located in Ireland
Taghmon
Taghmon
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 52°19′N 6°40′W / 52.32°N 6.66°W / 52.32; -6.66Coordinates: 52°19′N 6°40′W / 52.32°N 6.66°W / 52.32; -6.66
Country Ireland
Province Leinster
County County Wexford
Government
 • Dáil Éireann Wexford
Population (2006)
 • Urban 674
Time zone WET (UTC+0)
 • Summer (DST) IST (WEST) (UTC-1)

Taghmon (Irish: Teach Munna, meaning "House of Munn") is a village in County Wexford, Ireland. It lies on the R738 regional road, 14 km west of Wexford town and 24 km east-southeast of New Ross.

Taghmon, County Wexford

History[edit]

It can be established, from historical records, that the area now comprising the village of Taghmon has been inhabited since at least as early as 595 AD. Saint Fintan Mannu was granted land there in circa 597 by a chieftain, Dímma mac Áeda Croin who later became a cleric and was buried among the monks at the monastery.[1] His followers, were residing in the area then known as 'Achadh Liathdrom', which translates as 'the grey field on (or near) the ridge of a hill'.

Geography[edit]

Many Irish place names are topographically descriptive, and 'Achadh Liathdrom' is no exception. From the western side of the Forth Mountain, as it slopes down towards Ballintlea, a succession of gradual hills and valleys undulate their way across this part of County Wexford towards Camross, Bree and Carrigbyrne Hills. It is on one of these hills or ridges that the village of Taghmon is situated.

Modern Taghmon[edit]

Being a large growing village, Taghmon has many businesses that contribute to the local economy.

Transport[edit]

Rural Bus provides links with Wexford town, and a taxi company is situated in the village. Bus Éireann routes 372 and 373 serve Taghmon on Mondays and Tuesdays only providing links to Wexford Town, Wellingtonbridge and New Ross.[2]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Charles-Edwards, T.M. Early Christian Ireland page 117. Cambridge University Press, January 8, 2001.
  2. ^ http://www.buseireann.ie/pdf/1360756249-371.pdf