Taixuanjing

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Tai Xuan Jing Symbols
Range U+1D300..U+1D35F
(96 code points)
Plane SMP
Scripts Common
Symbol sets Tai Xuan Jing
Assigned 87 code points
Unused 9 reserved code points
Unicode version history
4.0 87 (+87)
Note: [1]

The text Tài Xuán Jīng ("Canon of Supreme Mystery", Chinese: 太玄經) was composed by the Confucian writer Yáng Xióng (Chinese: 揚雄/扬雄; pinyin: Yáng Xióng; Wade–Giles: Yang Hsiung; 53 BCE-18 CE). The first draft of this work was completed in 2BCE (in the decade before the fall of the Western Han Dynasty). This text is also known in the West as The Alternative I Ching and The Elemental Changes.[citation needed]

Just as the 8 x 8 = 64 hexagrams of the I Ching represent the Satvic form of matter in the universe, the 9 x 9 = 81 tetragrams represent the dynamic Rajic form of visible material in the universe. This basic framework lends credence to the theory proposed by sinologist John F. Sweeney that the Tai Xuan Jing was imported into China via translators, but ultimately rejected by the Confucian academy, which favored the more stable philosophy of the I Ching (Zhou Yi). Chinese intellectuals never embraced the doctrine and it lay forgotten for much of Chinese history.[citation needed]

If that is the case, the Tai Xuan Jing may[citation needed] represent an aspect of Hindu culture, but lost to India, which has been preserved by Chinese culture, although largely ignored by the Chinese. The original Tai Xuan Jing was probably written in Sanskrit and translated into Chinese. [2] In the same way, the 81 verses of the Dao De Jing and the 81 chapters of the medical text Ling Shu (Celestial Pivot) reflect the dynamism of the Rajic state and related philosophy.

In the Unicode Standard, the Tai Xuan Jing Symbols block is an extension of the Yì Jīng symbols. Their Chinese aliases most accurately reflect their interpretation; for example, the Chinese alias of code point U+1D300 is "rén", which translates into English as man and yet the English alias is "MONOGRAM FOR EARTH".[3] The monograms are:

  • the unbroken line (TXJ 1.svg ⚊) for heaven (Chinese: ; pinyin: tiān),
  • once broken line (TXJ 2.svg ⚋) for earth (Chinese: ; pinyin: ),
  • twice broken line (TXJ 3.svg 𝌀) for man (Chinese: ; pinyin: rén).

Numerically the symbols can counted as ⚊ = 0, ⚋ = 1, 𝌀 = 2, and grouped into sets of four to count from 0 to 80. This is clearly intentional as this passage from chapter 8 of the Tài Xuán Jīng points out the principle of carrying and place value.

Chinese English

推玄筭:
家 一置一,二置二,三置三。
部 一勿增,二增三,三增六。
州 一勿增,二增九,三增十八。
方 一勿增,二增二十七,三增五十四

Push Profound Calculation:
First Part: one sets one, two sets two, three sets three.
Second Part: one remains one, two adds three, three adds six.
Third Part: one remains one, two adds nine, three adds eighteen.
Fourth Part: one remains one, two adds twenty-seven, three adds fifty-four.

Tai Xuan Jing Symbols[1]
Official Unicode Consortium code chart (PDF)
  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F
U+1D30x 𝌀 𝌁 𝌂 𝌃 𝌄 𝌅 𝌆 𝌇 𝌈 𝌉 𝌊 𝌋 𝌌 𝌍 𝌎 𝌏
U+1D31x 𝌐 𝌑 𝌒 𝌓 𝌔 𝌕 𝌖 𝌗 𝌘 𝌙 𝌚 𝌛 𝌜 𝌝 𝌞 𝌟
U+1D32x 𝌠 𝌡 𝌢 𝌣 𝌤 𝌥 𝌦 𝌧 𝌨 𝌩 𝌪 𝌫 𝌬 𝌭 𝌮 𝌯
U+1D33x 𝌰 𝌱 𝌲 𝌳 𝌴 𝌵 𝌶 𝌷 𝌸 𝌹 𝌺 𝌻 𝌼 𝌽 𝌾 𝌿
U+1D34x 𝍀 𝍁 𝍂 𝍃 𝍄 𝍅 𝍆 𝍇 𝍈 𝍉 𝍊 𝍋 𝍌 𝍍 𝍎 𝍏
U+1D35x 𝍐 𝍑 𝍒 𝍓 𝍔 𝍕 𝍖
Notes
1.^ As of Unicode version 7.0

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Unicode character database". The Unicode Standard. Retrieved 22 March 2013. 
  2. ^ viXra:1407.0062 Why Base 60
  3. ^ Unicode Charts

External links[edit]