Takeshi Honda

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the animator, see Takeshi Honda (animator).
Takeshi Honda
Honda takeshi.jpg
Personal information
Country represented Japan
Born (1981-03-23) March 23, 1981 (age 33)
Height 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in)
Former coach Doug Leigh
Michelle Leigh
Galina Zmievskaya
Hiroshi Nagakubo
Retired 2006
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 207.78
2003 Skate Canada
Short program 77.54
2003 Skate Canada
Free skate 136.62
2003 Skate America

Takeshi Honda (本田 武史 Honda Takeshi?, born March 23, 1981) in Kōriyama, Fukushima is a Japanese retired competitive figure skater. He is a two-time World bronze medalist (2002, 2003), two-time Four Continents champion (1999, 2003), and six-time Japan national champion.

Career[edit]

Honda began short track speed skating at the age of six with his brother and switched to figure skating at nine.[1] At 12, when he entered junior high school, he moved to Sendai to train with Hiroshi Nagakubo.[2] Although he started the training somewhat late, he caught up very quickly and was, at 14, the youngest senior national champion in Japan ever. Honda became the first Four Continents Champion in history when he won the inaugural event in 1999.

Honda left Japan to train with Galina Zmievskaya in the United States and then moved to Canada to work with Doug Leigh. In 2002, Honda won the bronze medal at the 2002 World Championships and finished in 4th place at the Winter Olympic Games. He was the first male skater from Japan to medal at the World Championships since Minoru Sano took the bronze in 1977. Honda withdrew from the 2005 World Championships after injuring his ankle in a fall during the qualifying segment.

Honda ended his competitive career and turned to show skating in March 2006. He is also a TV commentator.[3]

Honda resides in Takatsuki city, Osaka to coach Daisuke Takahashi (as a technical coach)[4] and Kansai University Skating club.[3] He also coached Mai Asada.[5]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2005–2006
[6][7]
Romeo and Juliet
by Nino Rota
Tosca
by Giacomo Puccini
The Dirty Boogie
by Brian Setzer
2004–2005
[8]
Piano Concerto No. 1
by Frédéric Chopin
Warsaw Concerto
by Richard Addinsell

Red Ribbon[9]
by Kodo (taiko group)

The Dirty Boogie[10]
by Brian Setzer
2003–2004
[11]
Romeo and Juliet
by Nino Rota
Warsaw Concerto
by Richard Addinsell
Wherever You Will Go
by The Calling
2002–2003
[12][13][1]
Leyenda
by Vanessa-Mae
Riverdance[9]
by Bill Whelan

The Mummy
by Jerry Goldsmith

Moulin Rouge!
by Steve Sharples

Wherever You Will Go
by The Calling

2001–2002
[14][15]
Don Quixote[16]
by Ludwig Minkus

Sing Sing Sing[16]
by Louis Prima

Concierto de Aranjuez[9]
by Joaquín Rodrigo

Rhapsodia Cubana
by Ernesto Lecuona

Bonzo's Montreux
by Led Zeppelin
2000–2001
[17]
Don Quixote[16]
by Ludwig Minkus
Concierto de Aranjuez[9]
by Joaquín Rodrigo
Mambo Mambo
by Lou Bega
1999–2000 Violin Concerto
by Felix Mendelssohn
Rising Sun[16]
by Kitarō
I Could Not Ask For More
by Edwin McCain
1998–1999 Two-Minute Warning
by Ernie Albert

Doop-Doop
by Doop

The Man in the Iron Mask [16]
by Nick Glennie-Smith
Heaven and Earth (1990 film)
by Kitarō

I Believe I Can Fly
by R. Kelly

1997–1998 Original song[18] El Cid[19]
by Miklós Rózsa
I Believe I Can Fly
by R. Kelly
1996–1997
[20]
Tico Tico Swing Kids[9]

Results[edit]

Results[21]
International
Event 1995–96 1996–97 1997–98 1998–99 1999–00 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06
Olympics 15th 4th
Worlds 13th 10th 11th 6th 10th 5th 3rd 3rd WD
Four Continents 1st 5th 2nd 2nd 1st WD
Grand Prix Final 5th
GP Lalique 3rd
GP NHK Trophy 4th 9th 6th 2nd 6th 4th 1st 2nd 7th 9th
GP Skate America 6th 7th 2nd 2nd
GP Skate Canada 9th 5th 3rd 5th 1st 3rd 7th 4th
GP Sparkassen 5th
Nebelhorn 1st
Asian Games 1st
National
Japan Champ. 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 5th
GP = Grand Prix; WD = Withdrew

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Honda Finds Second Home In Canada". GoldenSkate.com. August 6, 2003. Retrieved September 5, 2011. 
  2. ^ "日本のメダリストのコーチたち~長久保裕編(2)" (in Japanese). Sports Hochi. July 27, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "フィギュア本田 コーチ業満喫" [Honda, Figure skater enjoys coaching)] (in Japanese). yomiuri. December 12, 2006. Retrieved May 8, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Daisuke Takahashi Fan Forum Profile". 
  5. ^ "Mai Asada profile" (in Japanese). 
  6. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2005/2006". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 18, 2006. 
  7. ^ "Cutting Edge"pp.90-91
  8. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2004/2005". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on July 23, 2005. 
  9. ^ a b c d e 『Cutting Edge』p.19
  10. ^ "Cutting Edge" p.91
  11. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2003/2004". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 4, 2004. 
  12. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2002/2003". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on February 17, 2003. 
  13. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2002/2003". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on December 2, 2002. 
  14. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2001/2002". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 11, 2002. 
  15. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2001/2002". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 4, 2001. 
  16. ^ a b c d e "Cutting Edge" p.91, 19
  17. ^ "Takeshi HONDA: 2000/2001". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on June 9, 2001. 
  18. ^ 『氷上の貴公子』p.105
  19. ^ 『氷上の貴公子』p.10
  20. ^ Mittan, J. Barry (1997). "Takeshi Honda". Archived from the original on May 12, 2012. 
  21. ^ "Competition Results: Takeshi HONDA". International Skating Union. 

External links[edit]