Takshak clan

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Taxakeshwar temple
Statue of Taxaka at Taxakeshwar temple

Thakshak or Taxak, classically called the Taxilleans (/ˌtæksəˈlənz/; Latin: Taxillae), is a gotra or clan of Jats and Rajputs[1] found in India, Pakistan. This clan has descended from Nagavansh/Suryavansha king named Takshaka.

History[edit]

The ancient inscriptions in the Pali Buddhist character have been discovered in various parts of Rajasthan of the race of Taxak or Tak, relating to the tribe Mori and Parmara are their descendants. Taxak Mori was the lord of Chittor from very early period.[citation needed]

The Huna Kingdom of Sialkot (of Mihir Kula 515-540 AD), destroyed by Yashodharman, was subsequently seized by a new dynasty of kshatriyas called Tak or Taxaka. The Taxak Mori as being lords of Chittor from very early period and few generations after the Guhilots supplanted the Moris, this palladium of Hindu liberty was assailed by the arms of Islam. (725-35) we find amongst the numerous defenders who appear to have considered the cause of Chittor their own the Tak from Asirgarh. This race appears to have retained possession of Asirgarh for at least two centuries after this event as its chieftain was one of the most conspicuous leaders in the array of Prithvi Raj. In the poems of Chandar he is called the "Standard, bearer, Tak of Asir." [2]

Taxakeshawar temple[edit]

Main article: Taxakeshwar

Taxakeshawar or Takhaji is a place of religious and historical importance with temple of Taxaka in Mandsaur district in Madhya Pradesh. It is situated at a distance of 22 km from Bhanpura town on Hinglajgarh road.[3] This is the site of serpent king taxak, where he is worshiped as Taxakeshawar but the local people call him Takhaji. Curiously enough he shares the worship of the country folk with Dhanvantari, the Indian Aesculapius.[4][5] The shrine in question stands on a most romantic spot from village Navali situated on the table land at the foot of which Bhanpura lies.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=qKMrAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA106
  2. ^ Dr Naval Viyogi: Nagas – The Ancient Rulers of India, Their Origins and History (The History of the Indigenous people of India Vol. 2), Published by Originals (an imprint of Low Price Publications), Delhi, 2002, ISBN 81-7536-287-1, p.148
  3. ^ Usha Agarwal:Mandsaur Zile Ke Puratatvik samarakon ki paryatan ki drishti se sansadhaniyata - Ek Adhyayan, Chirag Prakashan Udaipur, 2007, p. 35
  4. ^ Dr Naval Viyogi: Nagas – The Ancient Rulers of India, Their Origins and History (The History of the Indigenous people of India Vol. 2), Published by Originals (an imprint of Low Price Publications), Delhi, 2002, ISBN 81-7536-287-1, p. 27
  5. ^ J.P.H. Vogel:Indian Serpent lore, p.206
  6. ^ Dr Naval Viyogi: Nagas – The Ancient Rulers of India, Their Origins and History (The History of the Indigenous people of India Vol. 2), Published by Originals (an imprint of Low Price Publications), Delhi, 2002, ISBN 81-7536-287-1, p. 27