Talbot Hunter

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Talbot Hunter
Sport(s) Hockey, lacrosse, soccer
Biographical details
Born Toronto, Ontario
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Hockey
1909–1912
1914–1916
1919–1920
1921–1923

Lacrosse
1915–1916
1919–1920
1921–1923
1927–1928

Soccer
1914–1915
1919–1920

Cornell
Cornell
Yale
Army


Cornell
Yale
Army
Harvard


Cornell
Yale
Accomplishments and honors

Championships

  • 1912 intercollegiate ice hockey championship
  • 1923 USILA national championship
Awards

Talbot Hunter was a Canadian college hockey, lacrosse, and soccer coach. He served as a coach at Cornell University, Yale University, the United States Military Academy at West Point, and Harvard University.

Biography[edit]

Hunter was a native of Toronto, Ontario, and attended the University of Toronto.[1] He coached the Cornell University ice hockey from the 1909–10 season through the 1911–12 season.[2] He led the Big Red to the 1912 intercollegiate hockey championship.[3]

In 1914, Hunter returned to Cornell to take over the soccer team, and later, the hockey team. In 1915, his responsibilities were increased to include those of head coach for the lacrosse team, of which he was the first non-student-coach.[4] Hunter coached the lacrosse team for two seasons and amassed a 7–8–1 record.[5] Hunter was the first person to coach all three sports at Cornell.[3] His Cornell soccer teams compiled a 2–5–5 record over his two seasons,[6] and his hockey teams amassed a 26–15–11 record.[2]

In 1919, he was hired as head coach of the Yale University hockey, lacrosse, and soccer teams.[7]

Hunter coached the Army lacrosse team from 1921 to 1923, and compiled a 16–5–1 record.[8] In 1923, he led Army to an 8–1–1 record and its first national championship in lacrosse.[9] He coached the hockey team from 1921 to 1923 and compiled a 12–12–2 record.[10]

Hunter served as the head coach for the Harvard University lacrosse team in 1927 and amassed a 3–8 record.[11] He began 1928 as coach, but fell ill midway through the season and was replaced by H. W. Jeffers.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ SPRING ATHLETICS BOOMING AT ARMY; Squads in Nine Different Sports Active -- Baseball Season Opens Wednesday, The New York Times, April 1, 1923.
  2. ^ a b Men's Hockey - Year-by-Year, Cornell University, retrieved August 1, 2010.
  3. ^ a b Hunter To Coach Cornell Teams, The New York Times, October 16, 1914.
  4. ^ 2009 Cornell Men's Lacrosse Media Guide, p. 50, Cornell University, 2009.
  5. ^ 2009 Cornell Men's Lacrosse Media Guide, p. 57.
  6. ^ Men's Soccer History, Cornell University, retrieved August 1, 2010.
  7. ^ YALE HOCKEY PLANS.; Elis to Make an Extensive Tour Through Canada This Month, The New York Times, December 12, 1919.
  8. ^ 2009 Army Men's Lacrosse Media Guide, p. 90, United States Military Academy, 2009.
  9. ^ 2009 Army Men's Lacrosse Media Guide, p. 78.
  10. ^ 2009–10 Army Hockey Media Guide, p. 93, United States Military Academy, 2009.
  11. ^ Coaching Register, Harvard University, retrieved August 1, 2010.
  12. ^ Geoffrey H. Movius, The Second H Book of Harvard Athletics, 1923–1963, p. 681, Harvard Varsity Club, 1964.