Talk:Émilien Amaury

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Resistance and maquis[edit]

I've deleted the reference to "maquis" in the intro. It was added as an explanation of the Resistance. The two, however, weren't the same. Resistance movements started soon after Occupation, in 1940. That's significant in the story because Amaury was associated with one of the first, the rue de Lille group. Two years later, Vichy agreed to send men to Germany for war work, partly in the expectation that French PoWs would be released in return. The work was first voluntary, then compulsory. It was when it became compulsory that men took to the hills and lived in the undergrowh, the "maquis". That was two years after Occupation and the first Resistance groups, however. By then the Resistance was larger and better developed. Its leaders realised these young men hiding from the Germans were ideal recruits, which is what many became. In time the Resistance movements grouped, on the insistence of Jean Moulin. But so far as Amaury's early involvement is concerned, it is better to refer to the "Resistance", as an overall term, and not to confuse it with the "maquis". Hope this helps. Les woodland (talk) 05:02, 2 December 2009 (UTC)les woodland