Talk:Ögedei Khan

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Untitled[edit]

"There have been rumors and myths where he committed adultery and had a kid with his daughter. He accused her for witchcraft and executed her and his son by being trampled by horses then being burned." That´s hard. Where is it from?

That is sort of like Genghis Khan treating his first "son" like a son. Genghis Khan didn't kill his son but deprived himof being his successor.

vgu[edit]

What does "vgu" at the end of the article's background section mean? Samnikal 09:10, 12 March 2006 (UTC)

successor[edit]

Was he really succeeded by Mongke Khan? I thought he was succeeded by Guyuk Khan. District Attorney 23:46, 7 January 2007 (UTC)

The Death of Occoday (Ögedei)[edit]

Plano Carpini: "For, at the time of our aboard in to the countrey, a certaine duke of Russia named Andreas (Andrej) was accused before duke Bathy for contieying the Tartar horses out of the land, and for selling them to others; and although it could not been prooued, yet was he put to death". Who was this Andrej, and who was his younger brother who was humaliated at the front of the Bathy and his colonels and capitains.

What about this [citation needed]: "For there was taken (to Karakorum for justice) a certane Consubine of the Khan which had poysoned Khan´s father (Occoday) to death to have a iustige of the Mongolols of their own. Moreouer, upon the foresaide Consubine, and many other of her confederants sentence of iudgement was pronounced, and they were put to death (1246) by the way of their own."

How this is linked to foresaide: "At the same time Ieroslaus, the great Duke of Soldal, which is a part of Russia, deceased. For being (as it were for honours sake) inuited to eate and drinke with the Khan of the Khans mother, and immediately after the banquet, returning vnto his lodge, he fel sicke, and within seven dayes, died. And after his death, his body was of strange blew colour, and it was commonly reported via our informanter, that the said Duke was poysoned to the ende that Tartars might free and totally possess his Dukedom".

Khan of the Khans: Ögedai 1229-1241 (poisoned)[citation needed]

Khan of the Khans: not mentioned 1241-1246 (widow of Ögedey?)[citation needed]

Khan of the Khans: Gujug 1246-1248 (poisoned?)

Khan of the Khans: not mentioned 1248-1251 (widow of Gujug?)

Khan of the Khans: Möngke 1251-1259

What is the link between these three and who poisoned Ögedei? From the text we found that word her means she not he. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.114.205.131 (talk) 05:28, August 30, 2007 (UTC)

Ogedai Kahn wouldn't have conquered all of Europe[edit]

John Keegan's History of Warfare discusses the strategies and tactics employed by the Khans. One key area was the use of mobile warfare dependent on their large cavalry. His theory was that after leaving the Steppes, this cavalry would have had serious challenges in feeding the horses - less pasture land - and would have gradually lost enough horses to sustain that type of warfare. It was inevitable, according to Keegan, that they would have failed.

For that reason I feel the section discussing their ability to conquer all of Europe needs to be better balanced. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.253.81.39 (talk) 03:10, 24 January 2011 (UTC)

Idiotic citation[edit]

Seriously, you are using a fantasy novel as a citation for the European invasion. Get real. 173.8.132.118 (talk) 17:56, 5 September 2012 (UTC)


I was thinking the same and deleted this:

Mongol forces were moving on Vienna, launching a fierce winter campaign against Austria and Germany in the first wave into Western Europe, when Ögedei died.

The Mongols have never been anywhere in Germany. The main reason why they didn't attack is because the mongols weren't allmighty. Germany was heavily wooded and the german forces were way stronger than the polish or hungarian forces. Mongols needed wide fields for their tactics. Attacking the holy roman empire in such a terrain would have been a suicide mission.

If you read Wikipedia's own article about the mongols in hungary, you will read that the Hungarians kept the mongols east of the Danube until winter 1492. Ögedai died in December 1491. In 1492 only small Mongolian forces chased King Bela through Croatia, where they suffered several defeats, until they finally retreated.

2003:81:6D01:DC01:CC6D:5F17:4693:5186 (talk) 16:48, 29 May 2014 (UTC)--2003:81:6D01:DC01:CC6D:5F17:4693:5186 (talk) 16:48, 29 May 2014 (UTC)