Talk:14 regions of Augustan Rome

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Comment[edit]

I don't know the English names for Oppius and Cispius hills: I used the Latin names. Alessio Damato 19:31, 10 September 2005 (UTC)

Oppian and Cispian, probably. Shouldn't this page title simply be "14 regions of Augustan Rome" with the "the" omitted?--CaesarGJ 08:51, 22 February 2006 (UTC)
if you think it may sound better, just change it :-) Alessio Damato 17:12, 23 February 2006 (UTC)

Why 14? "As above, so below" - the sacred geometry of two 14 day periods in lunar month[edit]

Why did Caesar Augustus and his advisors choose to disect the City of Roma into 14 regions? "As above, so below" is the primary concept behind the practice of sacred geometry which was practiced by the ancient Romans, Greeks, Egyptians, Hebrews, Sumerians, Persians, etc. The phases of the Moon's 29.5 day cycle was very important to the ancients! It was clear to everyone around the world that it was easy to halve the lunar month into 14-day periods, and halve those into weeks.

This 'number from nature' as reflected in Pagan Roma's 14 regions is probably also the basis of why "in 1731, Pope Clement XII extended to all churches the right to have the stations of the Cross, provided that a Franciscan father erected them, with the consent of the local bishop. At that same time the number was fixed at 14". - Brad Watson, Miami 71.196.11.183 (talk) 19:15, 27 September 2011 (UTC)

Since there was a correspondence between terrestrial and celestial templa in Roman augury, I don't want to reject your contribution out of hand, but as it stands, this is WP:OR and not suitable for inclusion in the encyclopedia unless you have a secondary source that meets standards for RS. Cynwolfe (talk) 20:05, 27 September 2011 (UTC)