Talk:1992 Formula One season

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Why is Schumacher mentionned in the Belgium race?[edit]

Sure it was his first race, but at the time he wasn't an important player in F1 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.82.155.2 (talk) 08:19, 18 April 2010 (UTC)

Are you perhaps thinking of the wrong year? Schumacher's first race was the 1991 Belgian GP. By the time of the 1992 Belgian GP, Schumacher was a regular front-runner with six podiums under his belt and was lying fourth in the championship. DH85868993 (talk) 02:27, 19 April 2010 (UTC)
And indeed he won the 1992 Belgian Grand Prix, which is a fairly good reason to mention him :) Brickie (talk) 13:29, 28 April 2010 (UTC)

Why isn't the new technology of the Williams team highlighted in this season?[edit]

the Williams team's use of advanced computer control systems was a first for F1 racing, and gave them a clear advantage and path to the chapionship, so it's something which should be mentioned on this page for competeness's sake. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.108.65.189 (talk) 10:11, 23 February 2013 (UTC)

One of Williams advances by 1992 was the perfection of active ride suspension, a technology pioneered by Lotus six years earlier. Advanced computer control systems had been widely used across Formula for a decade. Apart from the Continuously Variable Transmission, there was nothing revolutionary about the Williams FW14B, indeed it was not even a new design, having been adapted from the 1991 Williams FW14. Its dominance in part drew from Benetton and Ferrari losing touch with Williams.
It was an evolutionary car, rather than revolutionary. --Falcadore (talk) 13:14, 23 February 2013 (UTC)