Talk:2–3 tree

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Untitled[edit]

This page must be corrected. The illustrations at the top contradict the definition given. Students in my class go to pages like this, and it must be corrected immediately. Vegasprof (talk) 13:02, 16 October 2008 (UTC)

Dubious[edit]

According to notes in "Introduction to algorithms" by Cormen (B-Trees chapter), 2-3 Trees are not B-Trees. I also found this article: http://cs.engr.uky.edu/~lewis/essays/algorithms/2-3trees/trees2-3.html ("2-3 Trees as Search Trees")

2-3 Trees have been introduced in 1970 by J.E. Hopcroft. B-Trees have appeared later in 1972 (R. Bayer and E.M. McCreight "Organization and maintenance of large ordered indexes")

B and 2-3 are so different. For example, B-Trees include data in non-leaf nodes, but 2-3 only in leaves. In B-Trees terms, tree's degree must be >= 2 -- 2-3 are trees of degree equal to 1.

If I'm right, there is incorrect information on "B-tree" page (Overview section): "For example, in a 2-3 B-tree (often simply referred to as a 2-3 tree), each internal node may have only 2 or 3 child nodes."

(E 3521 (talk) 06:07, 24 May 2010 (UTC))

The third example at the insertion section contains errors.How Si Yu (talk) 10:42, 8 November 2014 (UTC)