Talk:2001 Dartmouth College murders

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Crime (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Crime, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Crime on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Death (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Death, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Death on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject United States / Dartmouth (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject United States, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of topics relating to the United States of America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the ongoing discussions.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject New Hampshire - Dartmouth College (marked as Mid-importance).
 

Noteworthy?[edit]

I guess the question is ... are double homicides committed by a pair of teenagers in a peaceful, rural New England, college town notable. I believe both Half and Susanne have several published works of their own. Especially Susanne appears to have been a prolific writer. (I will add materials to the article as time permits.) The article available from the CourtTV link has a lot more information from which we could base a more substantial article. Interestingly, another double homicide was committed in Hanover, NH in June of 1991. Such events, while they happen all the time world wide, do shake up a region that often can have the attitude 'Oh, but that cannot happen here ...' Keesiewonder talk 01:45, 23 March 2007 (UTC)

When I searched for Boston Globe archives trying to see if there was, as claimed on some web sites, an article about Archimedes Plutonium in them, there were articles on this case coming out of its ears (but no sign of any article mentioning Plutonium). One can also find articles on the World Wide Web such as this. See Glasgow Ice Cream Wars for what articles about such cases can become, with a bit of attention. All that is required is for editors to edit. Uncle G 00:46, 24 March 2007 (UTC)
Since nobody has really replied to this... the citations/references/further reading for this article could be improved a bit, but there are at least two published books about the murders and trials, which were covered extensively in newspapers and national television news coverage, all of which more than satisfies the Wikipedia criteria for notability. Archimedes Plutonium's tangential relationship to the case is documented in the Francis book, pages 87-92.--Kharker 02:58, 26 October 2007 (UTC)

I think it's noteworthy simply because it had so very much press at the time, it was in international story. Whether or not it SHOULD have been is in my opinion certainly a matter of debate, but it is beyond debate that it WAS an extensivly covered international news story. I speculate that the reason for that was because of the initial erroneous belief that neo Nazis were involved. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.112.85.74 (talk) 22:50, 14 July 2010 (UTC)

Materials[edit]

  • A review of Judgement Ridge in the New York Times Book Review ISSN 0028-7806 by Andrea Higbie, yr:2003 vol:153 iss:52655 pg:28
  • A book review by Half Zantop reviewing the book Annotated Bibliographies of Mineral Deposits in Europe (ISBN 0080302432) (by John Drew Ridge). Zantop's review is called "Earth Sciences" and is in American Scientist ISSN 0003-0996, 1985, Vol. 73, Issue 2.
  • A book review ("A Necessary Resource") by Half reviewing the book Annotated bibliographies of mineral deposits in Europe: Part 2: Western and South Central Europe (ASIN B000OGX08O) (by John Drew Ridge) in Resources Policy, ISSN 0301-4207, March 1992.

Rename[edit]

The biggest problem with this article is its name. It shouldn't be named after the victims, because that is a highly misleading and overly narrow scope for the article. It shouldn't just be a biographical article about these two people. The (copious) sources deal not only with the biographies of the victims, as background, but with their murders, the lengthy investigation, the many false leads, and the subsequent court cases. I've only skimmed many of the sources, but most of them appear to use the name the Dartmouth Murders. Uncle G 14:43, 24 March 2007 (UTC)

I can go with that, at least for now. The renaming also opens the possibility of including the other pair of folks murdered on the edge of the Dartmouth campus. I will provide their names here later today. That case was not an investigational mystery like the Zantop case, though. Keesiewonder talk 16:56, 24 March 2007 (UTC)

Andrew Patti story[edit]

The story about the murderers visiting Andrew Patti's house in Vershire, Vermont and being scared away when Mr. Patti showed them his handgun is from a pro-gun magazine, the American Handgunner. It may be a made-up and/or distorted story. Are there other sources for this? Timothy Horrigan (talk) 13:41, 7 October 2009 (UTC)

I have read Judgement Ridge and the Andrew Patti story is well documented in that book. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.112.85.74 (talk) 22:43, 14 July 2010 (UTC)

Furthermore, it was not a possible first murder attempt - Parker admitted that they tried to kill Patti as Patti himself described. They even dug holes in the back for Patti and his son, according to the book Judgement Ridge. It was without any question at all a first attempt. And they were scared away by the handgun which Patti deliberately showed them through his front door window when he began to suspect that something was amiss. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.112.85.74 (talk) 22:47, 14 July 2010 (UTC)

Andrew Patti's story was used in John J. Donohue's Fordham Law Review article "Guns, Crime, and the Impact of State Right-To-Carry Laws" to counter John Lott's argument that defensive gun use can save lives. Donohue's argument was that the two lives (Patti and son) saved in Vershire with a gun cost the lives of the two professors Zanthrop in Etna (73 Fordham L. Rev. 623, Nov 2004). So sources include not only a pro-gun magazine, but an anti-gun crusader, both basicly relying on the killer's admission. I used to be amazed to find a source challenged on Wikipedia just by using the label "pro-gun". It seems to be SOP. --Naaman Brown (talk) 13:41, 13 October 2014 (UTC)