Talk:2004 Democratic National Convention keynote address

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prominent transcript links for speeches[edit]

I added a header link to the transcript, which is what many readers will want to see as soon as they visit this page. I didn't find a specific template for this, but it might be useful to have one specifically to link to popular wikisource documents. There is a big difference between a "<sisterproject> has related material" link and an article about a document which document is available in its original form -- the latter is much more interesting to readers. +sj+ 03:25, 26 September 2009 (UTC)

Dead link[edit]

During several automated bot runs the following external link was found to be unavailable. Please check if the link is in fact down and fix or remove it in that case!

--JeffGBot (talk) 08:11, 11 June 2011 (UTC)

Dead link 2[edit]

During several automated bot runs the following external link was found to be unavailable. Please check if the link is in fact down and fix or remove it in that case!

--JeffGBot (talk) 08:11, 11 June 2011 (UTC)

Dead link 3[edit]

During several automated bot runs the following external link was found to be unavailable. Please check if the link is in fact down and fix or remove it in that case!

--JeffGBot (talk) 08:11, 11 June 2011 (UTC)

Dead link 4[edit]

During several automated bot runs the following external link was found to be unavailable. Please check if the link is in fact down and fix or remove it in that case!

--JeffGBot (talk) 08:11, 11 June 2011 (UTC)

Dead link 5[edit]

During several automated bot runs the following external link was found to be unavailable. Please check if the link is in fact down and fix or remove it in that case!

--JeffGBot (talk) 08:11, 11 June 2011 (UTC)

Dead link 6[edit]

During several automated bot runs the following external link was found to be unavailable. Please check if the link is in fact down and fix or remove it in that case!

--JeffGBot (talk) 08:11, 11 June 2011 (UTC)

Reception section paragraph[edit]

I removed this introductory paragraph of the "Reception" section added by Joshdboz (talk | contribs) when they created this article on March 8, 2009:

Obama's speech instantly catapulted him to a national stage, both as a star within the Democratic party and someone who pundits openly predicted might one day become president.[26] Obama's biography, recounted in the speech, was reported by The New York Times to have allowed him to credibly identify with a much wider array of people than other politicians, and he did not place himself in a black tradition.[26] Obama's address was also seen as signaling a possible change in the black political leadership in the country.[27] However, it was not clear whether the address would help Kerry, and was noted for taking some of the limelight from another young Democrat, John Edwards.[28]

26. Malcomson, Scott L. (August 1, 2004). "An appeal beyond race" The New York Times, p. WK5.
27. Tilove, Jonathan (July 27, 2004). "Boston events may be changing of the guard in black politics". Washington, D.C.: Newhouse News Service.

28. (editorial) (July 29, 2004). "Obama's speech a hit with liberals, conservatives". Peoria Journal Star, p. A4.

for several reasons:

  • it is not an introduction to, or summary of, the subsections and sub-subsections following it.
  • the reference for the first two sentences is an opinion essay by Scott Malcomson (foreign editor of The New York Times Magazine and author of the 2001 book One Drop of Blood: The American Misadventure of Race).
    • the first sentence misleadingly implies that it was Obama's keynote speech which "instantly" made him a star in the Democratic Party and someone that pundits predicted might one day become president—but Obama's unexpected landslide victory in the March 16, 2004 Illinois U.S. Senate primary had already done this, which is why he was selected to be the 2004 DNC keynote speaker (see the references for the lede section of this Wikipedia article).
    • the second sentence incorrectly attributes Scott Malcomson's personal opinions as news reporting by The New York Times.
  • the reference for the third sentence is a news analysis piece Jonathan Tilove (national correspondent of the Washington bureau of the now defunct Newhouse News Service and author of the 2003 book Along Martin Luther King: Travels on Black America's Main Street).
    • the reference is not about the reception of Obama's keynote speech—it was written before Obama's keynote speech and argued that leadership of black America was passing from Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr. (who for the first time in decades did not give a speech at a Democratic National Convention) to Barack Obama (2004 DNC keynote speaker) rather than Rev. Al Sharpton (a candidate in the 2004 Democratic presidential primaries who endorsed Kerry after dropping out of the race in March, and was scheduled to give an 8-minute speech at the 2004 DNC).
  • the reference for the fourth sentence is a Peoria Journal Star editorial by a home state newspaper that had endorsed him in the March 2004 primary.
    • "Obama electrified the Democratic convention on Tuesday with a keynote address that pushed John Edwards aside, however briefly, as the party's new bright light." --> ...and was noted for taking some of the limelight from another young Democrat, John Edwards.
    • "How much this will help the Democratic presidential nominee, John Kerry, is, of course, uncertain." --> However, it was not clear whether the address would help Kerry, ...
    • these were throwaway lines in an editorial, not a news article reporting that Obama's speech (25% of which was devoted to praising John Kerry vs. 8% of Chris Christie's 2012 RNC speech mentioning Mitt Romney) would not help the Democrats or John Kerry, or that the speech overshadowed John Edwards—whose speech the following night was at least televised by the commercial broadcast television networks (unlike Obama's).
    • on the Sunday July 25, 2004 Meet the Press before the keynote speech, the third question from Tim Russert to Obama was about Ryan Lizza's Atlantic Monthly article "The Natural. Why is Barack Obama generating more excitement among Democrats than John Kerry?"

Newross (talk) 21:32, 13 November 2012 (UTC)