Talk:2011 East Africa drought

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Turkey spearheading rapid rehabilitation[edit]

  • "it is hard not to be impressed with the pace of the massive Turkish effort to help rebuild war-ravaged Somalia in such a short period of time."
  • "Somali Prime Minister Abdiweli Mohamed Ali told Bozdağ that Turkey has done more in three months than the UN did in five years"
  • "the Turks are the only ones visible on Mogadishu's streets trying to bring the city back to life. They have succeeded to a certain degree, but so much needs to be done"
  • "Turks built hospitals, including the largest one in the city, refurbished existing ones with modern medical equipment, established schools, dug a couple of dozen wells for potable water and set up a tent city (which will later be converted into apartment flats by Turkey's mass housing development agency). The Turkish Red Crescent provides daily meals to some 15,000 refugees/internally displaced persons living in the newly set up center close to the airport"
  • "Not only did Turkey mobilize national governmental and nongovernmental organizations to rush to provide aid here but made sure the assistance efforts would be spearheaded by Turkish nationals with the cooperation of locals on the ground. It was not just about sending money and feeling good about it. They took risks while others shied away from Somalia"

http://www.todayszaman.com/columnistDetail_getNewsById.action?newsId=273795

Middayexpress (talk) 15:01, 15 March 2012 (UTC)


regarding recent efforts by Turkey:

INSIGHT-Turkey tries out soft power in Somalia, Reuters, Sun Jun 3, 2012.

' . . . Addressing the Istanbul conference on Friday, Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan urged the United Nations to intensify its operation in Somalia, and called on other countries who wanted to help to establish a greater on-ground presence there.

'"We have really struggled to make Somalia's voice heard, to make those who do not see or feel what's going on in Somalia, see and feel," he said. In August, he became the first leader from outside Africa to visit Mogadishu in nearly 20 years. . . '

' . . . Late last year, the charity Doctors Worldwide Turkey converted a building formerly used as an ammunition dump into Mogadishu's most hi-tech hospital, doing it in just two months. . . '


Turkey tells U.N., aid donors to move to Somalia, euronews, Reuters, Jonathon Burch, June 1, 2012.

' . . . Erdogan’s direct remarks at a international conference on Somalia in Istanbul, the second hosted in Turkey in two years, were a sign of his administration’s growing clout and ambitions in Africa.

'“Without living there you cannot devise the correct policies and you cannot help. I invite the international community to open representative offices,” Erdogan told the conference attended by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, the Somali interim president and delegations from more than 50 countries. . . '

' . . . U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who has visited Somalia since Erdogan’s trip, said the world body was relocating more staff to the country and also called on international donors to work together.

'“Here in this room we are partners who can join forces, who can make a major difference for Somalia’s future,” he said.

'“Today I ask all of you to make this happen, in memory of those Somalis that have died and in service to those who deserve to live in peace and prosperity for generations to come.” . . '

posted by Cool Nerd (talk) 00:55, 4 June 2012 (UTC)
Interesting, but off-topic. The meeting was on post-conflict reconstruction in southern Somalia, not specifically on the earlier 2011 drought in the larger East Africa region. Middayexpress (talk) 14:04, 4 June 2012 (UTC)

FEWS NET rain report for April 11-20.[edit]

US AID, USGS, FEWS NET (Famine Early Warning Systems Network) http://www.fews.net/docs/Publications/FEWSNET_Som_dekadal_rainwatch_April_11-20_2012_final.pdf SOMALIA Rain Watch, April 24, 2012

"The 2012 Gu rains started during the second dekad (11th to the 20th) of April . . . "

" . . . In Shabelle regions, most livelihoods received light to moderate rains, but Wanlaweyn district, Costal Deeh and adjacent agropastoral areas of Middle Shabelle received localized light showers. However dry weather persisted in the coastal strip between Marka and Badhadhe districts of the South. In most parts of Gedo and Juba regions, light to moderate rains with various intensity and coverage were received. However, field reports indicate that riverine and agropastoral areas of Sakow and Salagle districts received localized light showers and remained largely dry. . . "

Probably should include some of this, maybe not all of it, for space, and also this is a lot of detail. Cool Nerd (talk) 18:59, 19 May 2012 (UTC)

FewsNET map for April-June 2012[edit]

http://www.fews.net/_fews/images/imagery/r2_near_fp.png

Except for a few insurgent-controlled spots, emergency level conditions have almost completely receded (c.f. previous). Crisis level conditions have likewise significantly given way to stressed level conditions. Middayexpress (talk) 19:44, 19 May 2012 (UTC)

File:Oxfam East Africa - A mass grave for children in Dadaab.jpg to appear as POTD[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Oxfam East Africa - A mass grave for children in Dadaab.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on February 16, 2013. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2013-02-16. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page. Thanks! — Crisco 1492 (talk) 02:58, 7 February 2013 (UTC)

Picture of the day
A mass grave for children in Dadaab

A young girl standing amid the freshly made graves of 70 children in Dadaab, Kenya. Many of them died of malnutrition during an extensive drought in East Africa, which began in July 2011. Many people died on their journeys to the overcrowded refugee camps; the camp in Dadaab, although built for 90,000 people, held at least 440,000 at its peak.

Photograph: Andy Hall
ArchiveMore featured pictures...


Links[edit]

>> Aid agencies: Cooperating or compromising? v (Lihaas (talk) 21:52, 10 December 2013 (UTC)).