Talk:2012 phenomenon

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Suggested addition: "Siginificant events that actually occurred in 2012" (or some version of it)[edit]

Probable discovery of the Higgs boson (sometimes called "God Particle") at CERN[edit]

Main article: Higgs boson

Some theorists (e.g. those of ancient astronauts theories) suggest that there is a link between the end of the Mayan calendar in 2012, and the probable discovery of the Higgs boson by CERN in the same year. Their hypothesis is that the Mayan calendar's end was actually foretold (by time travelers or aliens who visited Earth in ancient times, and had knowledge of the future) as a future event of great importance (e.g. discovery of the Higgs boson).[1]

CERN LHC Tunnel1

The Higgs boson or "Higgs particle" is an elementary particle in the Standard Model of Particle physics. Its main relevance is that it is the smallest possible excitation of the Higgs field[2][3] – a field that unlike the more familiar electromagnetic field cannot be "turned off", but instead takes a constant value almost everywhere. The presence of this field explains why some fundamental particles have mass while the symmetries controlling their interactions should require them to be massless, and why the weak force has a much shorter range than the electromagnetic force.

Despite being present everywhere, the existence of the Higgs field has been very hard to confirm, because it is extremely hard to create excitations (i.e. Higgs particles). The search for this elusive particle has taken more than 40 years and led to the construction of one of the world's most expensive and complex experimental facilities to date, CERN's Large Hadron Collider,[4] able to create Higgs bosons and other particles for observation and study. On 4 July 2012, the discovery of a new particle with a mass between 125 and 127 GeV/c2 was announced; physicists suspected that it was the Higgs boson.[5][6][7] By March 2013, the particle had been proven to behave, interact and decay in many of the ways predicted by the Standard Model, and was also tentatively confirmed to have positive parity and zero spin,[8] two fundamental attributes of a Higgs boson. This appears to be the first elementary scalar particle discovered in nature.[9] More data is needed to know if the discovered particle exactly matches the predictions of the Standard Model, or whether, as predicted by some theories, multiple Higgs bosons exist.[10]

In mainstream media the Higgs boson has often been called the "God particle", from a 1993 book on the topic; the nickname is strongly disliked by many physicists, who regard it as inappropriate sensationalism.[11][12] On December 10, 2013 two of the original researchers, Peter Higgs and François Englert, were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for their work and prediction.[13] Englert's co-researcher Robert Brout had died in 2011 and the Nobel Prize is not given posthumously except in unusual circumstances.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The God Particle". Ancient Aliens. Season 6. Episode 17. 8 August 2014. 44 minutes in. History. http://www.history.com/shows/ancient-aliens/videos/the-god-particle.
  2. ^ Onyisi, P. (23 October 2012). "Higgs boson FAQ". University of Texas ATLAS group. Retrieved 2013-01-08. 
  3. ^ Strassler, M. (12 October 2012). "The Higgs FAQ 2.0". ProfMattStrassler.com. Retrieved 2013-01-08. [Q] Why do particle physicists care so much about the Higgs particle?
    [A] Well, actually, they don’t. What they really care about is the Higgs field, because it is so important. [emphasis in original]
     
  4. ^ Strassler, M. (8 October 2011). "The Known Particles – If The Higgs Field Were Zero". ProfMattStrassler.com. Retrieved 13 November 2012. The Higgs field: so important it merited an entire experimental facility, the Large Hadron Collider, dedicated to understanding it. 
  5. ^ Biever, C. (6 July 2012). "It's a boson! But we need to know if it's the Higgs". New Scientist. Retrieved 2013-01-09. 'As a layman, I would say, I think we have it,' said Rolf-Dieter Heuer, director general of CERN at Wednesday's seminar announcing the results of the search for the Higgs boson. But when pressed by journalists afterwards on what exactly 'it' was, things got more complicated. 'We have discovered a boson – now we have to find out what boson it is'
    Q: 'If we don't know the new particle is a Higgs, what do we know about it?' We know it is some kind of boson, says Vivek Sharma of CMS [...]
    Q: 'are the CERN scientists just being too cautious? What would be enough evidence to call it a Higgs boson?' As there could be many different kinds of Higgs bosons, there's no straight answer.
    [emphasis in original]
     
  6. ^ Siegfried, T. (20 July 2012). "Higgs Hysteria". Science News. Retrieved 2012-12-09. In terms usually reserved for athletic achievements, news reports described the finding as a monumental milestone in the history of science. 
  7. ^ Del Rosso, A. (19 November 2012). "Higgs: The beginning of the exploration". CERN Bulletin (47–48). Retrieved 2013-01-09. Even in the most specialized circles, the new particle discovered in July is not yet being called the “Higgs boson". Physicists still hesitate to call it that before they have determined that its properties fit with those the Higgs theory predicts the Higgs boson has. 
  8. ^ Cite error: The named reference CERN_March_2013 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  9. ^ Naik, G. (14 March 2013). "New Data Boosts Case for Higgs Boson Find". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2013-03-15. 'We've never seen an elementary particle with spin zero,' said Tony Weidberg, a particle physicist at the University of Oxford who is also involved in the CERN experiments. 
  10. ^ Cite error: The named reference Huffington_14_March_2013 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  11. ^ Sample, I. (29 May 2009). "Anything but the God particle". The Guardian. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 
  12. ^ Evans, R. (14 December 2011). "The Higgs boson: Why scientists hate that you call it the 'God particle'". National Post. Retrieved 2013-11-03. 
  13. ^ Overbye, D. (8 October 2013). "For Nobel, They Can Thank the 'God Particle'". The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-11-03. 

Discussion[edit]

The only part of this addition that is relevant to the article is the first two lines, and they are not referenced. Serendipodous 07:28, 6 November 2014 (UTC)

My laptop's battery charge got depleted before I could add a reference. I have added one now. --EngineeringGuy (talk) 08:37, 6 November 2014 (UTC)
I can't verify the information in that video, since it is region-blocked. Also, I'm not sure if "Ancient Aliens" qualifies as a reliable source, but I'll leave that to consensus. Serendipodous 08:49, 6 November 2014 (UTC)
Brief description of episode 17 given at Ancient Aliens#Season 6 (2013-14). --EngineeringGuy (talk) 09:57, 6 November 2014 (UTC)