Talk:21st century

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Large portions of the world have current population deficits..[edit]

Some areas have populations that are shrinking, not growing. Take Europe for example. If this trend has changed in the last 2-3 years, it hasn't changed much. The global population could easily double without becoming a major global problem.

Also, I always see some remark of "The War on Terror" on any political or social article even remotely related. I always see the criticisms of the 'war' but I never see the rebuttal as to why it might just be fighting the greater of two evils. Terrorist attacks involving islamic fundamentalists have been occuring since WW2. North Korea, for example, is an immediate threat to two U.S. allies, Japan and South Korea. Immediately after 9/11, the DOW industrial average dropped over 7% to around 8950, the largest decline ever in a single day. If you are referring to the Patriot Act, the slight majority think that the Patriot act doesn't go far enough. Note that only 13% know much about the Patriot Act. 60% know little or nothing about the Patriot act.

Just try to keep it objective for all readers. If you are going to start by listing criticisms, link the rebuttals as well. IMHO, McCarthyism and Nixon's strong arm tactics were more of a threat to civil liberties than the "War on Terror". Some would agree that the "War on Drugs" impedes on civil liberty more than the "War on Terror". Speaking of which, that page could use a Pro and Con list.

Alphabetical Order[edit]

In the Influential people in politics as of 2005 section, a note says the names are in alphabetical order. They are not. For instance, George Bush is right above Vladimir Putin while Jean Chretien is somewhere below both of them. It is probably easier to remove the note than to reorder them all.

Deaths in War (iraq)[edit]

Should we really have that Lancet study in there? Although it was definetely widely disseminated and is notable for maybe affecting people's views on the war, it's margin of error is absolutely enormous. Although the mean amount of deaths they predicted was 102,000, the 95% confidence interval is plus or minus 94,000. The study really isn't worth that much. The preceding unsigned comment was added by 209.50.91.70 (talk • contribs) 18:31, 11 January 2006.

Archbishop of Canterbury?[edit]

Should he be under 'influential people in relgiion'? He is the head of the Anglican Church, and his opinions are considered important when it comes to international events...

Neuromancer[edit]

Why is Neuromancer by William Gibson listed under Television and film when it's a novel? And I don't think any date was given in the book.

I'm deleting it.

The Nobel Prize[edit]

How about a section comprised of Nobel laureates?

Fix up the politics, wars & genoicide part?[edit]

There seems to be a lot of information on politics, wars & genocide. I think we should just have the title of the wars and not such a long description beside them to make it appear neater & cleaner.

21st Century[edit]

The watch for the beginning of the 21st century was held on 1999.12.31:23:59 to 2000.01.01:00:00.

Seriously, if you are going to count that there was 'no year zero', you might as well count in the correction of 10 days in 1752. The gregorian and julian calendars align from 1 Mar 200 to 28 Mar 300. The old style has 29 Mar 300, the new style is 1 Mar 300. The Julian calendar has 29 Feb 100 and 29 Feb 200, which are missing in the new calendar. So the date 1/1/1 OS is properly 30 Dec 1 BC, and 2000 years thereafter is 30 Dec 2000.

In reality, this is not what is going on. No one really cares if there were no year 0 or 10 days were dropped from the 18th century, or that the 15th century had one too many days. A century is a period of date-names, from which dates are allocated. When we stop using a particular century of date-names, and select a new one, the new century begins.

The real issue is whether the year is cardinal or ordinal.

Ordinal numbers are used for days and months. 1/1 means that 0 months and 0 days have passed, and the first of each is current. When Christ rose on the third day, he was not dead for three days, but cruxified on friday (afternoon), taken down on saturday, and was risen on sunday morning when they romped down after the sabbath, in short one and a bit days. Saying that one is in seventh grade at school, means six have been passed, and the seventh is current. It ends at 7.00000

The series of years is too much for a person to have observed the first, so it is taken as a cardinal, and that a date 2000 means that all numbers less than 2000 are no longer open for dates, and that dates begin 2000.xx.xx, (ie 2000.07.01 is 2000.5 years). The watch was for the closure of years 19xx.xx.xx (ie 20th century), and the opening of 20xx.xx.xx, (ie the 21st). Wendy.krieger (talk) 10:19, 22 August 2014 (UTC)

See discussion at Talk:20th century#Dates. Yes there is a year zero: see 0 (year). The number 2000 is a cardinal number. The number 21st is an ordinal number. The century of the 2000s did indeed begin on 1 Jan 2000, while the 21st century did indeed begin on 1 Jan 2001. That is a convention, not a denial of year 0. The meanings of ordinals and cardinals are not an issue, nor are their application to how years and centuries are numbered. Read a little history to find out why the convention developed the way it did. There is more than one logical way to work it (now), but that is because we have developed additional logical ways over time. It couldn't be done before the number zero existed, and zero couldn't be applied to numbering years before the idea of doing that was developed (relatively recently). And even then it was only for astronomy. It's computers entering the social mainstream (only 30-40 years' time) that have made year 0 enter mainstream awareness. But the older convention is still logical, and it will remain in use for independent reasons. Evensteven (talk) 18:46, 22 August 2014 (UTC)