Talk:5th Avenue (candy)

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Possible copyright violation[edit]

This article seems to take most of its content from the description on Hershey's web page about the 5th Avenue candy bar. It looks to me like this is a copyright violation, unless it is considered fair use to copy a product description like that. The web page in question is http://www.hersheys.com/products/details/fifthavenue.asp.

My complaint here has long since been addressed. I just wanted to make it clear that this complaint wasn't about the current version.Calathan 00:04, 26 April 2007 (UTC)

A copyright or copywrong?[edit]

"It was introduced in 1936 by William H. Luden"

Luden died at age 90 in 1949 in New Jersey. This would have made him about 77 in 1936. Luden's company was sold to Food Industries of Philadelphia in 1928. The Reading Eagle reports that he retired in 1927. W. H. Luden retired a rich man to Miami and Atlantic City, traveling frequently to Europe with his younger second wife.

Did W. H. Luden still work at age 77 for the new owners nine years after retiring ? Unlikely. More likely this copy from Hershey's Co. is inaccurate: the date is wrong or the attribution should be to the Luden's Company not W. H. Luden himself. The verb "introduce" is suspect in this context. It makes more sense that a company would "introduce" (begin marketing). An individual would more likely invent or develop a product, so the sentence tends to be misleading. This smacks of advertising copy, not history.


"was named after 5th Avenue in Reading, PA"

Luden's first factory was on 5th Street in Reading, so there may be a connection. But it is doubtful that the namers of the candy bar considered that the average buyer would make this connection. 5th Avenue in Manhattan was an art deco display of wealth, with many buildings built around 1930. This would have been an escapist association in the hard times of 1936, if the candy bar was indeed "introduced" about that time. This smacks of advertising copy, not history.


I suggest replacing the entire text of this entry with "A candy bar marketed by Hershey's Corporation". A full sentence is not necessary.

You make good points. The timeline makes good sense and your reasoning for how the candy was named appears sound. Someone should find a reliable reference and update the article accordingly and ad dthe reference link to the article. However, I don't agree a truncated sentence calling it a "candy bar made by Hershy's" is really following the spirit of contributing on a site like this. As you can see from the history there are several editors in who keep truncating the article to one mediocre sentence and then there are those who keep reviving the material from the Hershey's website. For me, I'm not particularly in the contributing or research mode these days. Maybe when I resume...I'll follow my advice and find a good citable source and make your suggested corrections. Dennis 16:13, 10 October 2006 (UTC)

Wikiality[edit]

Despite the doubts raised that this candy bar was named after 5th Avenue in Reading or that William H. Luden was the developer, and without addressing these points or the copyright issues in discussion or in the article, this article has reverted to (probably illegaly) quoting the Hershey Corp. website.

Who is the anonymous editor who reverts this page back without addressing the points? If all of this user 68.37.236.111 edits are as lame as this, s/he is doing a lot of damage to wikipedia. Making your own Wikiality?

This article is Totally Wrong, and Unchangeable.[edit]

This article persists in it's almost wholly inaccurate and probably illegal state. Any change is quickly reverted.

This is the kind of article that proves the criticisms of Wikipedia.


ggpauly

Nutrition stuff...[edit]

is that really necessary? --Catz [TC] 22:31, 5 February 2007 (UTC)

Error Regarding Name[edit]

5th Avenue is "named after 5th Avenue in Reading, PA." <---WRONG

First of all, there is no Fifth Avenue in Reading Pennsylvania, nor has there ever been.

The 5th Avenue Bar was named after the Fifth Avenue in New York City. The name was chosen due to the perceived sophistication of Fifth Avenue.

There is a 5th street in Reading, which was recently "rechristened" "5th Avenue" (in the downtown area) with promotional "street signs" that match the candy bar logo. The street officially remains 5th street, not 5th Avenue. The 5th Avenue candy bar is manufactured in Reading, which is the reason for the Fifth Avenue/Fifth Street promotion. So, in actuallity, 5th Avenue in Reading, PA was named after the candy bar, not vice versa. -Diego Gravez 04:58, 11 September 2007 (UTC)