Talk:65 nanometer

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Pentium 4[edit]

Can somebody PLEASE tell me what the Pentium 4 has to do with 65nm or leakage? It simply does not belong in this article.the1physicist 02:17, 17 August 2005 (UTC)

Next Milestone?[edit]

This article appears to contradict the 45 nanometer article. They both say they are the "next milestone" in semiconductor manufacturing... --Wulf 21:55, September 7, 2005 (UTC)

actually, the articles are virtually identical. this needs to be fixed!

Timeline[edit]

When will the process be in wide-enough use that companies will adopt it for 'consumer electronics' such as the PSP or the ipod? It's unclear whether this process is just starting to roll out, or whether it's geared up for consumer viability as a new standard.

In fact, can this be completely jumped over in favor of the 45nm process, which already has leakage solved?

This is already rolled out, and 45 nm is next. The 45 nm process can be started very soon, if it is similar to the 65 nm process, in particular a low-leakage version of 65 nm. If it is very different, then it will require more time to debug.218.168.143.177 11:16, 20 October 2006 (UTC)

Can someone cite the IEDM references? thanks218.168.143.177 11:36, 20 October 2006 (UTC)

"Soon" be phased out?[edit]

I don't think the 65 nm process is going to be phased out "soon": Intel is announcing that 90% of its chips are going to be made with 65 nm processes by this summer, and AMD is just starting to ramp up production of 65 nm chips. Although 45 nm chips are likely going to be released by late 2007/early 2008, 65 nm chips are likely to still be produced for some time (consider that AMD is still making largely 90 nm products). I removed the "soon" element, took out some of the references as they were unclear, and generally cleaned up the page. Sloverlord 15:27, 31 January 2007 (UTC)

Dates[edit]

We need to add dates, and we need to remove "relative time" references and replace them with "absolute time" references. This is supposed to be an encyclopedia, and the articles should still be relevant ten years from now, when 65 nm will seem quaint and archaic.I have added dates fro first use of the process for several processors. I will continue this. Please help.

Thanks. -Arch dude 04:07, 4 August 2007 (UTC)

Xbox[edit]

There is a lot of buzz around the internet about new Xbox 360 models containing 65 nm CPUs instead of the earlier 90 nm. This is assumed to improve the reliability of the console. I wonder if that should at all be mentioned in the article.--SkiDragon 07:32, 14 August 2007 (UTC)

it seems to be being mentioned twice, both as the "falcon" cpu and by it's Xenon codename. 204.83.242.221 00:27, 19 October 2007 (UTC)

Area of transistor[edit]

The article claims the width of the 65nm-long transistor is about 25nm. Does that mean the average surface area occupied by a single transistor is (65 x 25) 1,625 sq.nm? Anwar (talk) 17:27, 1 June 2008 (UTC)

Propagation delay[edit]

The article does not tell the changes in propagation delay (in ns) of a state signal/pulse between transistors. Anwar (talk) 17:45, 1 June 2008 (UTC)