Talk:ARPA-E

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Uncited block removed[edit]

From the House Science Committee:

In August of 2007, the President signed into law the America COMPETES Act (PL 110-69).

COMPETES codified many of the recommendations of the 2005 National Academies report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm, including to establish an Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) to sponsor “creative, out-of-the-box, transformational” energy research. ARPA-E is charged with developing technologies that: • Reduce dependency on foreign oil; • Improve the energy efficiency of all economic sectors; • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and • Maintain U.S. leadership in the development and deployment of energy technologies.

ARPA-E utilizes many of the same organizational elements that fostered the successful culture of innovation of DARPA at the Department of Defense. ARPA-E offers a significant shift for the Department of Energy (DOE), both for the research it conducts and how it conducts that research.

• ARPA-E will leverage the intellectual capital of the nation’s universities, commercial, industrial, and investor communities, and the national labs to pursue high-risk, high-reward research that neither these entities nor DOE would pursue on their own.

• ARPA-E will have the flexibility to sponsor R&D that spans multiple stages, from basic research to commercialization, and in areas that are otherwise too cross-cutting or multi-disciplinary to fit into the current DOE system. • ARPA-E will be an independent entity within DOE with a flat, non-bureaucratic management structure. The ARPA-E Director will report directly to the Secretary of Energy, and no other program within DOE will report to ARPA-E.

• The ARPA-E Director will have flexible hiring authority to recruit the best and brightest program managers from outside of government at competitive salaries and for limited tenures of 3-5 years to ensure that fresh ideas and talent circulate through the program.

• ARPA-E Program Managers are given extraordinary autonomy and resources to pursue high-risk technological pathways, quickly assemble research teams to “crash” on projects, and start and stop projects based on performance and relevance. ARPA-E projects will not be subject to the traditional peer-review system.

As recommended by the National Academies, ARPA-E funding should be seen in the context of expanding overall energy R&D investment to a level that begins to meet the scale and complexity of the challenge. First year funding should approach $300 million, and quickly ramp-up to $1 billion in subsequent years.

This looked like an uncited cut-n-paste from government propaganda. We need to fully cite verifiable sources and paraphrase into encyclopedic language. W Nowicki (talk) 20:39, 14 August 2011 (UTC)