Talk:A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte

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[Untitled][edit]

peace out Anybody know what jatte means? Google says it's "bowl," but somehow I don't think that denotation quite fits.

Perhaps its worth extending the Sondheim section? MikeyB! 23:27, 11 April 2006 (UTC)

Correct me if I'm wrong ...[edit]

... But I believe I saw this painting at the Metropolitan Museum Of Art in New York just yesterday. Actually, I'm almost certain. Has anyone checked with the Art Institute of Chicago to see if perhaps they loaned it to the Met?

At the Met is Seurat's final sketch of the painting, whereas the actual painting is in Chicago.--The lorax 03:07, 17 August 2006 (UTC)

Secret Squirrel[edit]

Wasn't this painting in an episode of Secret Squirrel? --Kinkify 12:51, 22 November 2006 (UTC)

The painting is in a Bugs Bunny cartoon with Elmer Fudd chasing Bugs through the painting. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.185.182.223 (talk) 23:38, 11 October 2007 (UTC)

Vista Wallpaper[edit]

This painting features in the full 64-bit version of Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium as a wallpaper, and I assume in many other of the versions of Vista available. Perhaps this is worth a mention? —Preceding unsigned comment added by FrozenOrb (talkcontribs) 00:48, 14 October 2007 (UTC)

I can't confirm that this painting is included in Windows Vista (I never used that version of Windows to any measurable extent), and it is certainly not included in Windows XP or Windows 7, but I can confirm that it is included in OS X since at least Snow Leopard, when I selected the Art desktop theme and became enamored of it. To echo the above poster, should this factoid be mentioned in the article I wonder? 81.164.152.54 (talk) 18:06, 3 September 2013 (UTC)

New version of picture[edit]

I thought the higher res version would be an improvement, but does it looks a little faded by comparison with the original pix? Suckindiesel 00:02, 30 October 2007 (UTC)

Yes, it does. But it's also larger and more detailed. I wonder which is the "truer" reproduction? I haven't been to the Art Institute in many years, so I don't know. Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? 00:25, 30 October 2007 (UTC)

An even higher resolution image, Image:Georges Seurat 031.jpg, is used on the French Wiki version of this article. It comes from a DVD-ROM & to my eye the colours fall somewhere between the original & my new version. However, as its unlikely I'll be in Chicago any time soon if ever, its more appropriate for somebody more local to decide which one to use. I was only browsing anyway. Suckindiesel 00:51, 30 October 2007 (UTC)


Actual Name of picture[edit]

I was at the Art Institute this weekend. They show and instruct that the picture is actually titled "A Sunday on La Grande Jatte." There is no "Afternoon" or "Isle." Here is a link to their page: http://www.artic.edu/artaccess/AA_Impressionist/pages/IMP_7_lg.shtml Is this enough attribution? A redirect page should be made since "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte" is a popular incorrect version.

SecretSquirrel[edit]

Yes i do believe that this painting was in an episode of bugs bunny. although i am very bored, i watched that episode yesterday. that is a fact (i think) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 59.167.198.151 (talk) 06:32, 10 May 2009 (UTC)

Sims 3[edit]

My sim just painted something like this: http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/1592/seurat.jpg —Preceding unsigned comment added by 89.142.63.115 (talk) 08:25, 21 July 2009 (UTC)

In the painting there is an odd object I can't figure out. It's in the left 1/2, at orizontal midpoint, above and slightly to the right of the top hat of a seated man. It is a white sphere surrounded by a brown circle & the brown then flows to the ground in front of a large boulder. Anyone have any idea what this is? 71.68.27.8 (talk) 16:40, 25 October 2009 (UTC)

La Grande Moose[edit]

Is it worth mentioning that there is a compilation volume of 'Rocky and Bullwinkle' entitled 'La Grande Moose,' and its cover is clearly an homage to this painting? It seems as valid a popular culture reference as any.

130.49.0.142 (talk) 03:11, 15 September 2010 (UTC)

Who mixed the zinc chromate in various colors? Seurat or the paint manufacturer?[edit]

The article is ambiguous about whether it was Seurat or the paint manufacturer (or both) who mixed the zinc chromate into colors besides pure yellow.

Tashiro (talk) 07:17, 20 February 2011 (UTC)

Origins of the dots in pointillism ?[edit]

In one of the lectures on the DVDs "From Monet to Van Gogh: A History of Impressionism" by Professor Richard Brettell, Dr. Brettell says that after Seurat had painted a substantial part of the "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte", he showed it to Pissarro. Pissarro gave two criticisms 1) The figures were too rigid and 2) The colors weren't bright enough. Pissarro recommended that Seraut use some newly developed paints that were just becoming available. Seurat didn't care that the figures were rigid since he was interested in Egyptian art and that style of figure was rigid. Seurat did want to use the new paints. He avoided completely repainting the picture by applying the colors as small dots on top of what he had already painted.

From the way that Brettell tells the story, it suggests that this was the origin of the dots in Seurats pointillism. Prior to this story, another painting by Seurat is discussed and it appears to be painted with many small brush strokes, not with dots.

I haven't found this story in other sources and I'm not sure that Dr. Brettell meant to imply that the overpainting was the origin of the dots in Seurat's pointillism. It would be interesting to know if Seurat had often used dots before this painting.

Tashiro (talk) 07:17, 20 February 2011 (UTC)

1884 in La Grande Jatte[edit]

Would anyone in 1884 really have described La Grande Jatte, an island completely surrounded in by villages and a twenty minute walk from the Villiers gate, as "a bucolic retreat far from the urban center"?

Bucolic? By then it was most certainly taking on characteristics of an urban park (you might even say this painting is proof of that). Far from the urban center? Perhaps, if crossing the parking lot at Wal-Mart is "far" for you. Otherwise, this wording is a bit misleading.

A map from two years later shows that the island is not that bucolic in locale, and "adjacent" would be a better word than "far" to describe its distance from the city center.

What about something like: "Although for many years it was an industrial site, it is today the site of a public garden and a housing development. When Seurat began the painting in 1884, the island was an idyllic retreat a short walk outside the city walls."

24.59.113.86 (talk) 06:42, 14 December 2012 (UTC)

Post- or Neo- ?[edit]

This article is categorized as Post-impressionism, but the Neo-impressionism article indicates that this painting marked the beginning of that movement. I cannot find any mention that the two schools share any overlap, which leads me to believe there is a crisis of consistency here. I do not claim to be an art history expert by any means, but I do know when further explanation of terminology (or wholesale reorganization) is warranted! Krychek (talk) 16:44, 4 June 2013 (UTC)