Talk:Abel Prize

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Former FLC Abel Prize is a former featured list candidate. Please view the link under Article milestones below to see why the nomination failed. Once the objections have been addressed you may resubmit the article for featured list status.
November 17, 2012 Featured list candidate Not promoted

All-world recipients[edit]

About the most recent change: Is it really necessary to specify that the mathematicians can be of any nationality? I would have thought the omission of any restrictions implied it? MasterDirk

I included that because I had put in the fact that the King of Norway awards the prize. I thought that might be misunderstood to imply that the recipient needs to be a Norwegian. Michael Hardy 16:36, 19 Jul 2004 (UTC)
It's not wrong in any way, I'm just not sure that the original text implied the price was Norwegians-only. But, I guess, as long as the text only gets clearer by this change I'll agree with you. Now, there's no way it could be construed to mean .no only, and that's a good thing :)MasterDirk
No Norwegians-only implications in the original text, no. Personally, I must admit I would rather prefer to avoid such a statement. An ultraquick look at the list of recipients, no doubt a sure thing for all but the most extremely busy of readers, would easily dispel any Norwegians-only notions, whatever small chance of that existing in the first place. --Wernher 02:52, 21 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Regarding the last edit (translating the initial funds into dollars)[edit]

Is it necessary? Is it a good thing? I know US$ is an important currency, certainly more important than NOK, but as WikiPedia isn't an American encyclopedia I feel it's somehow redundant and misguided. The money was set off in NOK, not in US$. I don't know whether non-Norwegians find NOK particularly difficult to handle, or whether it was added in an attempt to give casual readers a ballpark figure in their heads? Should we perhaps have the sum in € as well?


It would be a good idea to have the price in NOK with the Dollar (and perhaps Euro) equivalent in parenthesis. It is quite standard in world-class financial/commercial publications. Always use the original currency in the text. Hugo Dufort 06:57, 26 October 2006 (UTC)

Awarding vs. presenting[edit]

The King does not award the prize, he merely presents it (if he is able to attend the ceremony). The prize is awarded by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. --Niels Henrik Abel 19:22, 24 March 2007 (UTC)

Agreed. I changed the text accordingly. Hanche 17:17, 7 August 2007 (UTC)

In support of today's edit by User:Cronholm144[edit]

This page must be considered somewhat authoritative, and supports the reversal. (Hmm, how can I refer to a particular edit of a Wikipedia article?) Hanche 17:17, 7 August 2007 (UTC)

Abel Prize versus Fields Medal[edit]

Its wrong to establish that the Abel Prize is widely recognized the most prestigious, ask most professional mathematicians and they`ll say its the Fields Medal. It has a most rich history and the actual manner in which is awarded make it most prestigious, since is the International Mathematical Union that gives the award, not a National Academy or Goverment.

What do you think about the new wording, which doesn't explicitly compare them? — Carl (CBM · talk) 02:14, 14 April 2008 (UTC)
I agree that it is better not to call it the most prestigious: The current wording is a definite improvement. But I'd rather delete the sentence about the Fields medal; it doesn't quite belong, even though it is indeed perhaps the most prestigious award next to the Abel prize. (I don't agree with CBM's assessment of the the relative prestige of the two prizes: For one, because of the age limit on the Fields medal they do not quite compete in the same “market”, and secondly, the prestige will be slowly accumulated or eroded over time, depending on how well the committee handles their job. But this minor disagreement should not spill into the main page.) Hanche (talk) 18:44, 19 April 2008 (UTC)
I don't really know which one is more "prestigious"; we can probably agree the Fields medal is better established. I don't mind if the sentence about the Fields medal is removed from the lede. — Carl (CBM · talk) 19:29, 19 April 2008 (UTC)
Done. And I agree. 8-) Hanche (talk) 06:44, 23 April 2008 (UTC)
Seems like the Abel Prize is more prestigious since it's $992,000 USD vs $15,000 USD for the Fields Medal, and there is no age limit like Fields Medal has--71.163.31.116 (talk) 03:29, 16 October 2010 (UTC)
Prestigiousness is hard to quantify, and its source is harder to track down (I think), but surely, the amount of the award and the lack of an age limit is not sufficient. Indeed, it is possible to effectively destroy the prize by repeatedly awarding it to clearly undeserving candidates – which is one reason why the committee is recruited from among the world's top mathematicians. In any case, this is too subjective a topic to include in an encyclopedia article. Hanche (talk) 19:49, 17 October 2010 (UTC)

Was there a 2002 Abel prize?[edit]

The article states:

"In August 2001, the Norwegian government announced that the prize would be awarded beginning in 2002, the two-hundredth anniversary of Abel's birth."

But the table of winners begins with 2003. Was there, or wasn't there, an Abel prize awarded in 2002?Daqu (talk) 18:19, 28 June 2008 (UTC)

There wasn't; see the official site of the Abel prize. It is true that the creation of the prize was announced in 2001, and I believe it was the intention to award the first prize in 2002, but that there wasn't enough time to pull it off. After all, one needed to invite nominations, create a committee, and give the committee time to do its work. Not to mention the minor detail that the parliament had to actually grant NOK 200,000,000 first. Hanche (talk) 02:14, 29 June 2008 (UTC)

The amount awarded[edit]

The latest edit concerning the size of the prize is surely inflated, though I am not sure I feel like correcting it. After all, exchange rates vary, and who wants to update the amount all the time? What is fixed is the amount of the prize in Norwegian kroner, namely six million. Based on today's exchange rate, as well as I can establish, that is about USD 877,000 or EUR 667,000, somewhat lower than what is stated. What's a good solution? Clearly, we cannot take the word of some random news agency here. Hanche (talk) 19:49, 30 March 2009 (UTC)

I know that wikia.com has a sort of script to automatically update prices and calculate profits and costs and such, see the table here: http://runescape.wikia.com/wiki/Dragon_scale_dust
It would be interesting to see if Wikipedia can make use of something like this.

Leaks[edit]

This is wikipedia, not wikileaks. Let's keep this year's laureate off the page until the recipient has been officially declared, shall we? This is the second time in a row the news has leaked here. Sheesh. Hanche (talk) 11:06, 24 March 2010 (UTC)

And like last year, the leaker appears from the IP address to be at École normale supériure de Lyon. Hanche (talk) 12:11, 24 March 2010 (UTC)
Like last year, the laureate's name could be found on Abel comitee's website before the official announcement. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 140.77.141.125 (talk) 12:56, 24 March 2010 (UTC)
Thanks for the information. I didn't even know the Abel committee had a website. Or are you talking about the official web site of the Abel prize? But that wasn't updated before the announcement either, as far as I could tell. Now I am really curious. Please enlighten me. Hanche (talk) 13:59, 24 March 2010 (UTC)
So I guess it's a bad time to inform wikipedia that Milnor will receive it tomorrow? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.226.61.249 (talk) 18:09, 22 March 2011 (UTC)
You don't know to leave well enough alone, do you? Hanche (talk) 09:38, 23 March 2011 (UTC)
Hmm, the official website is a lot better this year; I fear we'll have to wait for the official announcement. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 140.77.141.79 (talk) 09:35, 21 March 2012 (UTC)

Flags[edit]

There seems to be a minor edit war going on, with the US flag being alternately removed and added next to Endre Szemerédi's name. Could we please try to establish some principle for the use of these flags? If it's to be based on citizenship, I don't think the US flag belongs, as I haven't seen any evidence that Szemerédi has become a US citizen. But if it based on affiliation, it's okay, since he has been a professor at Rutgers University since 1986. Can anybody point to established wikipedia policy indicating what's right? Or should we just forget about those flags, and remove them all? Hanche (talk) 16:49, 1 April 2012 (UTC)

I don't know if there's a policy, but actually every solution has pros and contras. Taking citizenship is clear and easy (one either has another or not), but may cause some problems if he gets another one, or is revoked later, whatever. Taking the affiliation is great as well, since one may have not been able to get those results if it would not be connected to the institute. However, what do we mean under affiliation? Does one need a specific rank or a period of time of collaborating to qualify for that? There might also be other uncommon but not impossible things like one may have more citizenships during his life without moving away from his hometown (because of wars, dissolutions of countries, etc); or having a key position in more than one university/country during the period one achieves the results for what it gets the award (international cooperation, or something). Putting these together makes me think that removing the flags would be the best solution, as these might be incorrect and misleading even if they are added with the best faith, and may be a ground of further conflicts. If one is deeply interested in the life of the awardees, the information – that cannot be covered by adding a flag – may well be found in the bio articles. — Thehoboclown (talk) 14:21, 10 April 2012 (UTC)
MOS:FLAG provide some basis. Since the meaning attached to the flags in this context is indeed not clear, I support the removal. -- SchreyP (messages) 20:12, 10 April 2012 (UTC)
Thanks for the reference. I'll wait a few days, and if nobody comes up with a good reason to keep the flags, and can give a solid policy for their usage, I'll remove them. Hanche (talk) 15:39, 13 April 2012 (UTC)
Going to remove the flags now. Hanche (talk) 18:11, 19 April 2012 (UTC)

I reverted two recent edits by User:39.54.118.249, as these edits appear to have been done while disregarding the present section on the discussion page. I think this is bad form. Next time, please discuss the proposed change here first, giving your reasons. Hanche (talk) 15:58, 31 March 2013 (UTC)

Reverted edits again, for the same reason. Anonymous user in the same IP range. Hanche (talk) 19:58, 6 April 2013 (UTC)
The Abel prize is awarded to individuals, not to countries or to national representatives. Following WP:MOSFLAG and the discussion above, there is clear consensus against flags, and adding them without discussion leading to a new consensus is disruptive. Deltahedron (talk) 08:49, 21 April 2013 (UTC)

Two false references removed[edit]

Tomcat7 added two references which have no relation to the material they are supporting. I've previously encountered this same behavior over at Friedrich Eckenfelder and I am encountering it here again. According to the nomination review the references were not listing the material they supported. Tomcat7 added these personally. Edit in question. [1] Here is the other. [2] Edit: They have been fixed with the removal of one and the proper source on the other. ChrisGualtieri (talk) 14:41, 22 December 2012 (UTC)

Indian American?[edit]

I am pretty sure it is not possible to have dual citizenship as per Indian law. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2A01:388:201:3310:FC58:D512:3682:E751 (talk) 19:45, 26 April 2013 (UTC)