Talk:Abraham Lincoln

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Regret expressed by Allan Pinkerton[edit]

In his presidency, Lincoln was often protected by the Pinkerton Detective Agency through the Army Secret Service, a predecessor to today's Secret Service (the guys who'll tackle you to the ground if you touch the President without permission). and the inspiration for the stencil on the frosted glass of the detective's door for every cheesy film noir crime movie. His head of security, Allan Pinkerton (who ironically died after contracting gangrene on the tongue) has expressed regret that he wasn't able to prevent the assassination at Ford's Theatre in his absence.

65.87.51.212 (talk) 23:24, 8 August 2014 (UTC)

There needs to be some source reference that states Pinkerton expressed regret. Cmguy777 (talk) 01:48, 9 August 2014 (UTC)

Was this part of the speech?[edit]

I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races, that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality ... I will add to this that I have never seen, to my knowledge, a man, woman, or child who was in favor of producing a perfect equality, social and political, between negroes and white men. - http://hnn.us/article/153860 See more at: http://hnn.us/article/153860#sthash.q4X4aZ8j.dpufKevinFrom (talk) 15:31, 27 August 2014 (UTC)

As Frederick Douglass, said: "Despite the mist and haze that surrounded him; despite the tumult, the hurry, and confusion of the hour, we [blacks] were able to take a comprehensive view of Abraham Lincoln, and to make reasonable allowance for the circumstances of his position. We saw him, measured him, and estimated him; not by stray utterances to injudicious and tedious delegations, who often tried his patience; not by isolated facts torn from their connection; not by any partial and imperfect glimpses, caught at inopportune moments; but by a broad survey, in the light of the stern logic of great events, and in view of that divinity which shapes our ends, rough hew them how we will, we came to the conclusion that the hour and the man of our redemption had somehow met in the person of Abraham Lincoln. It mattered little to us what language he might employ on special occasions; it mattered little to us, when we fully knew him, whether he was swift or slow in his movements; it was enough for us that Abraham Lincoln was at the head of a great movement, and was in living and earnest sympathy with that movement, which, in the nature of things, must go on until slavery should be utterly and forever abolished in the United States. . . . I have said that President Lincoln was a white man, and shared the prejudices common to his countrymen towards the colored race. Looking back to his times and to the condition of his country, we are compelled to admit that this unfriendly feeling on his part may be safely set down as one element of his wonderful success in organizing the loyal American people for the tremendous conflict before them, and bringing them safely through that conflict. His great mission was to accomplish two things: first, to save his country from dismemberment and ruin; and, second, to free his country from the great crime of slavery. To do one or the other, or both, he must have the earnest sympathy and the powerful cooperation of his loyal fellow-countrymen. Without this primary and essential condition to success his efforts must have been vain and utterly fruitless. Had he put the abolition of slavery before the salvation of the Union, he would have inevitably driven from him a powerful class of the American people and rendered resistance to rebellion impossible. Viewed from the genuine abolition ground, Mr. Lincoln seemed tardy, cold, dull, and indifferent; but measuring him by the sentiment of his country, a sentiment he was bound as a statesman to consult, he was swift, zealous, radical, and determined." (1876) -- Alanscottwalker (talk) 11:40, 28 August 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 22 September 2014[edit]

In the second section it says that a mother died giving birth to a stillborn son. I didn't know what stillborn meant so I looked it up. Could we wikilink the word stillborn? 173.78.222.115 (talk) 14:53, 22 September 2014 (UTC)

Pictogram voting wait.svg Already done Done by MirrorFreak (talk · contribs) here Thanks, NiciVampireHeart 17:17, 22 September 2014 (UTC)