Talk:Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum

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Untitled[edit]

I don't have the time to edit this at the moment, and might get back to it, but I have to say this article has serious style issues. These style issues are compounded and intertwined with an obvious lack of NPOV; the article reads like a combination of sensational magazine write-up and outright brochure. I recommend that the article be branded with style improvement and/or NPOV tags. Dawson 08:51, 30 January 2007 (UTC)dawson

Good lord, yes. What on earth is a "full-immersion 'you-are-there'" display? I have no earthly idea. I suspect from the photos the writer means this is a "diorama". If so, why not just say "diorama". This isn't a travel brochure. I've made the appropriate edit. I honestly had no idea what the editor was talking about with the flowery language. 139.48.25.60 (talk) 19:41, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
Yes, this article still looks just terrible - advertising, POV, etc. I'll do some editing in a bit, but if anybody wants to join in, just let me know. Smallbones (talk) 16:09, 1 April 2011 (UTC)

Triva[edit]

I am not good at editing, but here's some trivia I got from some people working there...

In the theater scene, John Wilkes Booth is show opening the door with his right hand, and his left hand in his jacket, ready to pull out his gun. However, JWB is really right handed. The museum directors just wanted it that way because the look flowed really well. (66.190.139.140 (talk) 12:15, 13 April 2008 (UTC))

Poem about Gettysburg titled "HIS TURN" in honor of Sesquicenntenial Year[edit]

                         "HIS TURN" 
  On the nineteenth of November in eighteen sixty-three,
  a lenghty speech just ended, and the crowd stirred restlessly.
  As he sat on the podium that dedication day,
 he checked his notes to verify those words he'd chose to say.
 He wore black crepe around his hat in memory of his son.
 He thought of all the men who died and the battle that was won.
 A whiff of death breezed through the air as he steppped up to speak.
 Would they pay heed to his words? Would his message be too weak?
 His face was gaunt ,but he stood tall,and spoke with words sincere.
 They seemed impressed by what he said, he'd struck a chord so clear.
 His somber tone provoked their thoughts with feelings so profound.
 They sensed this was a special time upon that plot of ground.
 The crowd was hushed, made no response. He thought he'd failed that day.
 But truth be told he'd touched them all ,by what he had to say.
 It only took two minutes time to give a speech so great.
 And history has proven, it was well worth the wait...........
 I wrote this poem after reading about that day at Gettysburg.

Lincoln sat for over two hours awaiting "HIS TURN" .He was still in mourning for his son Wille. The noxious odor floated thru the air and he must have wondered if any of the remaining crowd would pay much attention to his brief remarks. They obviously were impressed....submitted by John P. Mc Geehan--11121 Wisconsin CT 2D Orland Park, Ill 60467 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.57.132.68 (talk) 20:06, 22 May 2010 (UTC)