Talk:Academic grading in the United States

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A,B,C,D,E,F[edit]

I have a document from 1921 indicating a medical school in Missouri used A,B,C,D,E,F in that order as a grading scale. Is this an anomaly? This article doesn't describe the history of the letter grade system, is it possible it used to be 6 letters and from there split to 5 with E or F?Promontoriumispromontorium (talk) 07:36, 29 September 2011 (UTC)

According to this article, it was: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2010/08/e_is_for_fail.htmlSheriffjt (talk) 19:21, 13 May 2014 (UTC)

Paragraph Regarding Law School Grades[edit]

I think that paragraph needs to be rewritten. It implies that law schools are not academically rigorous, which is not the case at all. Most American law schools have a curve system, where very few students can receive an A or A-, with the majority of the class receiving grades between B+ through C+, and a fair number of students receiving Cs. Furthermore, students are ranked against one another. Whereas, in many graduate school there isn't a limit imposed on the number of high grades a professor can award, and the students are not ranked. Therefore, often a large percentage of the class receives high grades, which causes what was otherwise a decent grade, B-, becoming rare and a sign of poor quality work. One could argue that the law school curve system and student ranking, which prevents grade inflation, actually make students work harder and compete for top grades, and thus, for example, a B- in a law school class may represent higher quality work than a B+ in a master's course.

Regardless, the paragraph should be rewritten. Mavirikk (talk) 22:20, 29 March 2010 (UTC)

New York University[edit]

I am a student at NYU and I know that NYU does not award a 3.5 for both A- or B+ grades. An A- is a 3.7 while a B+ is a 3.3. The example given needs to be changed to include a college where the point values for an A- and a B+ are in fact identical.Avman89 (talk) 21:21, 28 December 2010 (UTC)

4.0 = 100?[edit]

The article says "4.0 which is equivalent to 100 on a 100-point grading scale". Doesn't a GPA of 4.0 mean an A average instead of 100? Bubba73 You talkin' to me? 21:18, 4 November 2012 (UTC)