Talk:Acasta Gneiss

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How large is this outcrop?[edit]

How large is the outcrop, it doesn't say in the article. Could be a few square feet or many square miles. Please add. -- 92.229.181.16 (talk) 07:28, 16 June 2010 (UTC)

This source qives <20 km2, which may seem imprecise, but the older parts are found as inclusions in younger gneisses, rather than as one continuous body. Mikenorton (talk) 08:46, 16 June 2010 (UTC)

No longer the oldest rock[edit]

This is no longer the oldest known rock. The title now belongs to rock of Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada. http://www.cbc.ca —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.121.163.199 (talk) 19:16, 24 August 2010 (UTC)

From reading the abstract of the original Nature article,[1] which was the source of the CBC piece, it's clear that the report is referring to the age of the mantle from which the 60 million year old Baffin volcanic rocks were derived by partial melting, not the rocks at the surface. Mikenorton (talk) 20:33, 24 August 2010 (UTC)

No longer the oldest rock[edit]

LOL! This is no longer the oldest known rock. The title now belongs to a zircon fragment found in Australia, known as the Jack Hills Zircon and dated 4.4 GA. http://www.news.wisc.edu/releases/18407 Tim Riches, Brampton, Ontario (talk) 05:57, 26 February 2014 (UTC)

See Oldest rock#Oldest terrestrial material. The zircon crystals of the Jack Hills are old, but the metamorphosed conglomerate they occur in are a bit younger at 3.06 Ga. Vsmith (talk) 20:15, 26 February 2014 (UTC)