Talk:O Come, All ye Faithful

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WS[edit]

I removed the Move to WS template as it is already on WS--BirgitteSB 16:44, 27 December 2005 (UTC)

What's WS? Maikel (talk) 10:17, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

Oakeley[edit]

Shouldn't a separate stub article be created for Frederick Oakeley, rather than having him redirect here. (This would enable his categorization as a person rather than a song!) Dsp13 15:52, 27 September 2006 (UTC)

Please Remove SEX AND THE CITY[edit]

The television series "Sex and the City" ist totally blasphemous! Please remove immediately the reference from this article about a holy christian song - Janina- —Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.187.54.202 (talk) 12:00, 30 September 2007 (UTC)

OK if we leave the reference to Twisted Sister in? Or maybe we need to get clearance from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith first? Maikel (talk) 10:14, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

Adeste fideles = come, faithful[edit]

How can we make clear that "Come all you faithful" (or more simply "come, believers") is the English translation of the Latin "ADESTE FIDELES"? This doesn't come out clearly enough in the article, in my opinion. Maikel (talk) 10:14, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

Jacobites[edit]

A British academic has written that the song may somehow be related to the Catholic Jacobite uprisings of the early 18th century. [1] It would be interesting if anybody could back this up with more solid sources. 69.157.229.14 (talk)

Origin[edit]

I remember reading that this is originally an old Latin church song. Haven't been able to confirm it though. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 91.152.172.113 (talk) 20:57, 8 January 2009 (UTC)

That would certainly account for the Latin lyrics. Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? 22:46, 8 January 2009 (UTC)
It was written for the Lats. More accurately. the Roman Catholic liturgy and specifically the mass remained in Latin until the 1960s,[2][3] so it's somewhat likely that a Roman Catholic hymn writer would write in Latin in 1743. . dave souza, talk 00:01, 9 January 2009 (UTC)

The article should make more explicit the inconsistency between attributing the authority to John Francis Wade, born in 1711, and the existence of two earlier manuscripts dated from 1640 found at Vila Viçosa, in the same vein as purported to the supposedly authorship of Marcos António da Fonseca, also known as Marcos de Portugal. --Wcris (talk) 15:56, 31 January 2010 (UTC) .

I see no verifiable references to the manuscripts in the reference "Neves, José Maria (1998). Música Sacra em Minas Gerais no século XVIII, ISSN nº 1676-7748 – nº 25". I have read through this document and the author claims that the King is the author with no reference to manuscripts or anything else. Unless someone can come up with a reference for this I suggest removing the "King John IV" section completely and leave a note saying the the authorship has been disputed with a reference to the text by José Maria Neves. --Paulo Casanova 12:28, 21 May 2014

Thank you very much for your effort. The cited source by Stephan (1947) makes a convincing argument in debunking any Portuguese authorship, be it Marcos Portugal (Fonseca) or King John IV. I agree with your proposal to remove the reference to Neves' side remark in his paper. -- Michael Bednarek (talk) 12:15, 21 May 2014 (UTC)

Why are we waiting[edit]

Why_Are_We_Waiting redirects here. Is that because it is the same tune. In Britain, this tune is spontaneously sung by a group when they are kept waiting by another. The article should include an explanation of this redirect. --90.218.44.26 (talk) 05:15, 15 January 2009 (UTC)