Talk:Adolescent sexuality in the United States

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Former good article nominee Adolescent sexuality in the United States was a Social sciences and society good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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Reverting 10 revisions (twice)[edit]

I tried to fix a mistake where I said "see talk page", but it instead saved a second copy. Disregard. meteor_sandwich_yum (talk)

Virginity vs. Abstinence: what's the distinguishing factor?[edit]

So I was working on the section "Abstinence", subsection "Definitions of virginity". The question I have is regarding this, seemingly conflicting data from an excerpt of the article a few days ago:

Of adolescents age 12–16, 83% believe a person is still a virgin after engaging in genital touching, and 70% said they believed one retained their virginity after having oral sex. Additionally, 16% considered themselves virgins after anal sex. However, 44% believed that one was abstinent after genital touching and 33% believed one could have oral sex and still remain abstinent. Of anal and vaginal sex, 14% believed you could engage in the former and 12% said you could participate in the latter while still remaining abstinent.

So 70% believe oral sex makes you a virgin, yet 33% believe it does not disqualify you from being abstinent?

So Meg tells someone she's had oral sex

  • If they know she's never had sex before, 70% will believe that she didn't truly have sex
  • Yet if they know she has had sex before, 33% will believe that she didn't truly have sex

I don't get where the discrepancy of 37% comes in, so I can't figure out if the author is saying

  1. Abstinence and virginity are different terms, and teens view them differently, similar to "technical sex" and regular "sex"
  2. Two different age groups of teens view Meg differently, perhaps due to changing views while growing up (e.g., 12-16 yr. olds view it as X; 17+ view it as Y)
  3. Something else entirely?

No idea. I don't watch enough soap operas to figure this. meteor_sandwich_yum (talk) 12:59, 7 November 2013 (UTC)