Talk:Aesir-Asura correspondence

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No incoming links. No discussion. Dead external link. Anyone watching this page? Would anyone mind if this were moved to Æsir-Asura correspondence? - Haukur Þorgeirsson 21:54, 17 October 2005 (UTC)

Ancient oral history?[edit]

On the topic of the Aesir/Asura correspondence, I can't help but wonder if the Asura left India and travelled west until they found the home of the Vanir (and fought and defeated them)

Could this be a very old story of human migration?

In the Indian stories the violent Asura fight the Deva and leave. In Norse stories the Aesir arrive and fight with the more peaceable Vanir. When the Aesir win, they take hostages from the Vanir in the form of the god Nord, as well as his children Frey and Freja.

Has anyone done any research into this? Could it even be possible to work out?

Could it be that the stories told in both places are related, that it tells the story of migration, perhaps the leaving of more aggressive members of the proto-indian community, which then moved to the harsher climate of Europe and Scandinavia, bringing their own version of events with them?

Enough rambling, I hope someone finds this and responds.

Cheers(preceding unsigned contribution by User:Yeti42 03:12, 27 June 2007 --Tlatosmd 08:29, 22 August 2007 (UTC))


Replying here roughly three weeks later, you ought to have a look at Kurgan hypothesis as well as Proto-Indo-Europeans and Aesir#Invasionist_hypothesis. The Urheimat of Proto-Indo-Europeans was probably Central Asia, in the steppes where modern Russia and China meet, so they originated at an equidistance both to Europe and India. Their descendants obviously split up into a West-bound (proto-European) and a South-bound (Indo-Aryan) branch where they each conquered territories already settled by other cultures which they subjected to their rule. These pre-historical events echo in the mythical battles of Vanir and Aesir, in The Rape of the Sabine Women, as well as the battle between Asura and Deva. --Tlatosmd 08:29, 22 August 2007 (UTC)

Please delete[edit]

The article is a pile of unverifiable original research. There are several thousand correspondences between Russian and Sanskrit terms - should we start a separate page about each of them? While it may be interesting to hypothesize about the nature of correspondence between Sanskit "bhaga" (good) and Russian "bog" (god), I'm afraid it's not what Wikipedia is for. I hope these speculations will be prodded. --Ghirla-трёп- 17:12, 23 August 2007 (UTC)

It's certainly far from being OR since it's common knowledge in religious studies of Indo-European religions for at least 30 years by now, see for instance Schoeckel 1982 or this[1] other German source, it's only poorly sourced here. --Tlatosmd 01:38, 25 August 2007 (UTC)