Talk:African-American Civil Rights Movement (1954–68)

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Presidential administrations[edit]

I think this goes on a bit too much about the Kennedys and recommend deleting the following:

"In 1966, Robert Kennedy undertook a tour of South Africa in which he championed the cause of the anti-apartheid movement. His tour gained international praise at a time when few politicians dared to entangle themselves in the politics of South Africa. Kennedy spoke out against the oppression of the native population. He was welcomed by the black population as though a visiting head of state. In an interview with LOOK Magazine he said:

At the University of Natal in Durban, I was told the church to which most of the white population belongs teaches apartheid as a moral necessity. A questioner declared that few churches allow black Africans to pray with the white because the Bible says that is the way it should be, because God created Negroes to serve. "But suppose God is black", I replied. "What if we go to Heaven and we, all our lives, have treated the Negro as an inferior, and God is there, and we look up and He is not white? What then is our response?" There was no answer. Only silence.—Robert Kennedy , LOOK Magazine[74]" To me, these two paragraphs belong in his article, not here.Parkwells (talk) 20:54, 18 June 2013 (UTC)

In addition, President Lyndon Johnson should be given more credit for achieving passage of the 1964 and 1965 civil rights legislation - tell more about how he worked with Congress to do what he believed was the right thing. It's my understanding that his expertise was critical to achieving passage of this legislation.Parkwells (talk) 20:52, 18 June 2013 (UTC)
Generally agreeing with you, although the RFK South Africa trip may be worth mentioning—more secondary literature on its effect in the US is needed. (I wish the article discussed more connections to Africa, such as the Independence of Ghana (link), the "Year of Africa" and probably many other events unknown to me.) Also if we have space in the article for blockquotes from JFK, LBJ & RFK ... and MLK praising JFK ... and CSK praising MLK ... maybe we have space for some more contentious voices. No disrespect to any of the preceding.
Relatedly here are some relevant new articles related to things that happened in 1963: Baldwin–Kennedy meeting, Council for United Civil Rights Leadership, Birmingham crisis. Hopefully there will be time soon for greater depth of research on the March on Washington and subsequent Civil Rights Act (which was already 'in play' by June 1963). The opening of this article from 17 June 1963 provides some interesting context, although I wouldn't necessarily include it on the page here. Better yet, check out this search of the Google newspaper archive. shalom, groupuscule (talk) 21:50, 18 June 2013 (UTC)
I believe the South Africa trip is worth mentioning; the points are just to be a summary overview so it could be trimmed; further, a little more detail could be added as to the 1964 Civil Right Bill; this is how we wrote it in JFK's article (Legacy): "President Lyndon B. Johnson, Kennedy's successor, took up the mantle and pushed the landmark Civil Rights Act through a bitterly divided Congress by invoking the slain president's memory." As for the March on Washington, any additional detail one might want to add, could be copied over from MLK, Jr. where it is detailed and well cited. That's another thing, this article needs better inline citing. Kierzek (talk) 01:36, 19 June 2013 (UTC)

Infobox[edit]

African-American Civil Rights Movement
Rustin Young Ryan Farmer Lewis.jpg
Four leaders of the Civil Rights Movement. From left: Bayard Rustin, Andrew Young, (N.Y. Cong.William Ryan), James Farmer, and John Lewis in 1965.
Date 1955-1968
Location United States, especially the South
Goals End of racial segregation
Methods civil resistance, civil disobedience
Result Civil Rights Act of 1964
Parties to the civil conflict
Lead figures

Thoughts? --Երևանցի talk 02:19, 6 December 2013 (UTC)

This is a valiant effort and I appreciate your constructing it, but to be honest I feel it's a little too simplified—to the point of being counterproductive—and also takes too much of a particular POV. Also, I think we could come up with a better image for the lead (I realize you're using the one that's there now). Maybe some people on their feet? Maybe some women? Maybe not a white guy right in the middle? Yeah. groupuscule (talk) 07:34, 6 December 2013 (UTC)
I don't insist this particular version to be in the article. That is why I started this discussion. I agree that the infobox is nowhere near being perfect and it needs to improved before going up. I share your opinion about the picture. --Երևանցի talk 02:50, 7 December 2013 (UTC)

Arkansas "Relatively Progressive"?[edit]

In the Little Rock section, someone added "Little Rock, Arkansas, was in a relatively progressive Southern state." I deleted the reference to Arkansas being "relatively progressive." Someone then reverted my change. This isn't important enough for me to engage in a round revert/counter-revert but I think it's a misuse of language to apply the adjective "progressive" when it's a case of Arkansas not being quite as bad as Mississippi or Alabama. At the time in question, Arkansas maintained a thoroughly segregated school system, enforced Jim Crow segregation of public facilities throughout the state, and systematically denied blacks the right to vote. The fact that segregation in Arkasas was not enforced as violently as it was in some other southern states did not make Arkansas "progressive" or even "relatively progressive." It made Arkansas less bad, but that's not the same as "progressive." Brucehartford (talk) 18:26, 16 December 2013 (UTC)

Links[edit]

Ledgacy
>> Legacy of civil rights leaders source of fights(Lihaas (talk) 16:11, 16 February 2014 (UTC)).

Subtitle/ Date Proposal[edit]

The subtitle of this article currently refers to "(1955-1968)", yet the actual years covered clearly go back to 1954 (the year of the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision). Indeed, we could say coverage goes back to 1951, the year the first of the Brown v. Board lawsuits were filed. The Veterans of the Civil Rights Movement History and Timeline lists additional reasons for marking 1951 as the beginning of the modern movement. I propose that the title be amended either to 1951 or 1954. GPRamirez5 (talk) 23:22, 25 March 2014 (UTC)