Talk:Agile software development

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Song lyrics[edit]

I agree that the page needs to stay - however, what's with the parody song lyrics here? They shed no light on the subject and don't look very professional. (More "joke".)—Preceding unsigned comment added by 150.203.2.60 (talk) 19 April 2005

XP, Scrum, Crystal, etc. are Agile Methods[edit]

The History sections says: "Methodologies similar to Agile created prior to 2000—include Scrum (1986), Crystal Clear, Extreme Programming (1996), Adaptive Software Development, Feature Driven Development, and DSDM (1995)." However, according to p. 396 of Sommerville's Software Engineering textbook (reference 7 in the article), these methodologies are different types of agile methods. Will someone confirm this and make the change? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.216.63.120 (talk) 19 November 2007

Question[edit]

Why is there no mention that this methodology gets most of its "new" ideas from the Free Software and/or Open Source development models used by those respective communities? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 205.193.94.40 (talk) 9 December 2010

Introduction is odd[edit]

"Agile software development is a group of software development methods based on iterative and incremental development.."

By the manifesto, as referenced later within the article, Agile software development is a set of values that partially order aspects of software development. These values may indeed be used to categorise methods but it is wrong to give the impression that Agile software development can be defined as a group of (think concrete set) development methods.

NPOV?[edit]

This is like reading an ad for Agile. Things like: "Since then, the Agile Movement, with all its values, principles, methods, practices, tools, champions and practitioners, philosophies and cultures, has significantly changed the landscape of the modern software engineering and commercial software development in the Internet era"

Considering adding the NPOV template. Please discuss 188.207.125.243 (talk) 05:27, 18 June 2014 (UTC)

Obvious error[edit]

I am a technical writer learning about the Agile method from Wikipedia. I noticed what must be a typo. Change "Simplicity—the art of maximizing the amount of work not done—is essential" to Simplicity—the art of minimizing the amount of work not done—is essential" — Preceding unsigned comment added by 199.207.253.96 (talk) 19:58, 1 July 2014 (UTC)