Talk:Alcohol-related traffic crashes in the United States

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Sources[edit]

Hi Wham- Please note that I created this page (Alcohol-related traffic crashes in the United States) on 30-3-06 using Drinking and Drivingand Intoxicated Driving Statistics as Sources. Therefore, they are not spam. Thanks. David Justin 15:05, 7 March 2007 (UTC)

Sources information[edit]

Hi Wham- Please note that I created this page (Alcohol-related traffic crashes in the United States) on 30-3-06 using Drinking and Drivingand Intoxicated Driving Statistics as Sources. Therefore, they are not spam. Thanks.David Justin 18:20, 8 March 2007 (UTC)

Important[edit]

Hi Wham- Please note that I created this page (Alcohol-related traffic crashes in the United States) on 30-3-06 using Drinking and Drivingand Intoxicated Driving Statistics as Sources. Therefore, they are not spam. Thanks.David Justin 16:27, 9 March 2007 (UTC)

Documentation[edit]

Hi Wham- Please note that the material in bold is from “Intoxicated Driver Statistics.” The evidence demonstrates that the Wikipedia entry is sourced from that web page and indicating so does not constitute spam. To the contrary, it is proper documentation and consistent with Wikipedia guidelines. Thanks.David Justin 01:09, 19 March 2007 (UTC)


Alcohol-related traffic crashes are defined by the United States National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to include any and all vehicular (including bicycle and motorcycle) accidents in which' any '''alcohol''' has been consumed, or believed to have been consumed, by the driver, a passenger or a pedestrian associated with the accident. Thus, if a person who has consumed alcohol and has stopped for a red light and is rear-ended by a completely sober but inattentive driver, the accident is listed as alcohol-related, although alcohol had nothing to do with causing the accident. Alcohol-related accidents are often mistakenly confused with alcohol-caused accidents.

Nationally, 12.8% of all drivers involved in fatal accidents during 2001 are known to have been intoxicated according to the '''blood alcohol concentration''' (BAC laws) of their state. This number is based on a systematic examination of the official records of each and every accident involving a fatality during that year in the US.

The higher number (about 40%) commonly reported in the press refers to accidents defined as alcohol-related as estimated (not measured) by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Regardless of disagreements and confusion regarding traffic accidents involving alcohol, they have declined dramatically over the past 25 years in the US.

Majority of Fatalities[edit]

Apologies if I'm misunderstanding, but it seems to me that this statement:

"However, a majority of fatalities resulting from car accidents involving alcohol are from sober drivers who are hit by drunk drivers"

is radically contradicted by the NHTSA's 2007 report on alcohol impaired driving located here.

Table 1, page 1 seems to indicate that approximately 83% of alcohol impaired fatalities are either the impaired driver, or an occupant of their vehicle. If that is correct, this statement should be removed or corrected. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 97.122.124.81 (talk) 21:48, 14 December 2013 (UTC)