Talk:Alexandrine

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Origins of accentual-syllabic (iambic) alexandrine[edit]

Little agreement seems to exist over the origins of the six iambic footed Alexandrine. Some attribute its origin to Dryden's 17th century poem: 'Ode To The Feast Of Alexander'. This, however, is improbable as the Alexandrine is thought to be much older. Others date it to a 12th century collection of romances on 'Alexander Of Macedon'. Yet others to a poet whose name was Alexander, while others still take it as far back as Alexander Severus, Emperor of Rome. Whatever the truth, there is little doubt that it is a form that has experienced no small degree of popularity. Some examples of this form are as follows, (the second part, after the last comma, is the Alexandrine):

'Man may not augment, Where necessity fair resolves with false content.'

'When first begun, remote seems far away, But continuing much - much nearer seems as day.'

'Vanity, thou art a human failing, First relieved of the gods and next of holiness.' — Preceding unsigned comment added by 195.93.32.13 (talkcontribs) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 195.93.32.8 (talkcontribs)

French in English Wikipedia[edit]

The paragraph "Syllabic verse" use French poetry as example. Isn't there English poetry using syllabic verse? This is English Wikipedia, I guess much users do not understand French, and I guess English poetry is rich enougth to find suitable examples. — Preceding unsigned comment added by JeDi (talkcontribs)

English syllabic verse exists, but it isn't traditional. I think it began in the late nineteenth century. I can't think of any syllabic poets who adapted the alexandrine. That said, I'd be happy to be wrong. English lacks French's tradition of syllabic alexandrines. This is why the examples are in French. We should probably translate the text and link to an article on French versification.--168.122.245.185 (talk) 02:30, 1 May 2011 (UTC)
I'd just add that the article also gives more weight to French alexandrines because they are more encyclopedically notable as a topic within poetry. This may be the English wikipedia, but our goal is to write about all notable subjects, not to skew our treatment to English literature if the bulk of the subject's importance lies elsewhere. Of course, I'm all for additions that will more fully discuss any notable English alexandrines we may be neglecting! Let's distinguish between that and removing French examples in favor of English ones. Wareh (talk) 19:22, 2 May 2011 (UTC)