Talk:Alford plea

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"Also known as"[edit]

The introductory paragraph says:

An Alford plea (also called a Kennedy plea in the state of West Virginia,[1] an Alford guilty plea,[2][3][4] an "I'm guilty but I didn't do it" plea [5] and the Alford doctrine[6][7][8])

I think the label 'an "I'm guilty but I didn't do it" plea' is non-encyclopedic editorializing. I should be astounded if the plea is referred to by that name in any authoritative legal source. The cite given for that label is Barksdale, Titan (March 28, 2007). "(Not) Guilty – Lawyer in case that led to Alford plea says he worried about later questions". Winston-Salem Journal. p. B1.

There's no link so I can't check the article, but I'd guess that some person in the article referred to the plea by that name--but I don't think that's sufficient for using the name in the introductory paragraph. In any event, since the text isn't online, I can't check it.

I removed that name (with the comment Doubtful that this plea is seriously called an "I'm guilty but I didn't do it" plea), but my change was reverted by User:OtterSmith with this comment: Actually, it is. Think of lying cops; do you plead to a lesser charge or be executed if you don't. Your choice. Courts deliver decisions, not justice.)

It seems to me that OtterSmith's comment has nothing to do with whether this term is actually used for the plea in any authoritative setting. Rather, it's a criticism of how the plea is used, and an argument that the term would be an appropriate one for the plea. Even if so, that would make this appropriate for a "criticisms" section within the article, not the opening paragraph. And if it were in the "criticisms", we'd need a noteworthy source for that criticism. -- Narsil (talk) 17:20, 31 July 2013 (UTC)

UPDATE: From the previous talk section, I found an archived version of the article in question, at http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-30144461_ITM The phrase '"I'm guilty but I didn't do it" plea' does not appear in that article, in any form. It seems to me that using the phrase is, at the very least, original research (per WP:OR), and should come out of the article.
Note that I am not arguing about whether the phrase is accurate or apt, or whether the existence of the Alford plea is a good or bad thing. I'm just arguing about whether using that phrase in the opening sentence is appropriately encyclopedic. -- Narsil (talk) 17:34, 31 July 2013 (UTC)
Yesterday I invited User:OtterSmith to reply here, but didn't get a response. Since the source given doesn't support using the term an "I'm guilty but I didn't do it" plea, I'll remove that. OtterSmith, if you disagree please explain why here--thanks! — Preceding unsigned comment added by Narsil (talkcontribs) 14:45, 1 August 2013‎