Talk:Alkali

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Untitled[edit]

Could someone (with knowledge) please fix the "Common Properties" section? It seems to have be sabotaged or incomplete... 144.131.128.204 23:38, 18 February 2006 (UTC)

Definition[edit]

hey hey heyCould the Alkali page be updated with a definition? I get properties of alkali materials but there is no defining characteristic. What defines alkalinity?

What is the actual DEFINITION of Alkali? I am CLUELESS to all this stuff and trying to learn. Thanks

This article is very unclear. Just what is an alkali? Is an alkali an alkali salt, a base, a basic salt? Is a basic salt an alkali salt, or vice versa? I plan to rewrite this article. --Chemicalinterest (talk) 14:41, 18 May 2010 (UTC)

Last Paragraph[edit]

I believe the last paragraph of this article is misleading. It implies that there is a scientific basis for ingesting alkaline water. I know of no valid, scientific studies that show that.

Also, machines that purport to produce alkaline or ionized water probably produce miniscule amounts of either.--216.153.130.249 15:22, 3 October 2006 (UTC)

The last paragraph seemed to have no scientific background. I believe it was more of a product plug than anything having basis for this page, hence its deletion. Kal1917 16:59, 23 October 2006 (UTC)yeah they are not defining it

  1. REDIRECT [

e]] what where is the target page

Examples?![edit]

This article is useless without examples of common foods fitting the description.-DMCer 08:47, 9 July 2007 (UTC)

Ammonia[edit]

Quote:

"bases that are not alkalis, such as ammonia, are sometimes erroneously referred to as alkaline."

I disagree with this. Ammonia is alkaline because ammonia solution has a pH greater than 7. Biscuittin (talk) 13:56, 27 June 2008 (UTC)

I think you've missed the entire point of the "Confusion between alkali and base" section. pH greater than 7 makes ammonia a base, not alkaline. In common usage, ammonia is often called alkaline but this is wrong. NH3 contains no alkali elements nor alkali earth elements, therefore is not an alkali. Mattisgoo (talk) 03:05, 4 December 2008 (UTC)
Alkalis as soluble bases is a widely used alternate definition. I don't think it should be considered wrong.129.94.222.24 (talk) 06:42, 12 April 2010 (UTC)

Alot of scientific geniuses here. Wish i was that clever lol 122.57.194.123 (talk) 07:52, 18 November 2008 (UTC)


So really, this is one of those logic things is it?

Alkalines are bases, Therefore all bases are alkaline? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 194.105.181.145 (talk) 16:34, 27 January 2009 (UTC)

alakiis a property an opsisite of an acid.thankyou —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.11.3.99 (talk) 19:37, 17 March 2009 (UTC)

All alkalis are bases but not all bases are alkalis!! An alkali is just a soluable base, but not all bases are soluable, thus theres a separate word for it

Alkali vs Alkaloid[edit]

In relation to toxicity, what exactly is an alkali, and how does it compare to an Alkaloid? Glycoalkaloids?
Christopher, Salem, OR (talk) 12:24, 17 June 2010 (UTC)

Site of Importance/Tourism?[edit]

Does anyone know if Alkali Lake (Oregon) is generally open to the public, just as people would visit the Newberry National Volcanic Monument?
Christopher, Salem, OR (talk) 12:37, 17 June 2010 (UTC)