Talk:Allspice

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Untitled[edit]

It's as hot as peppers between 100 and 500 su

Interesting question. This article needs more information on the biology and commercial cultivation of the plant itself. I think this would be useful because public knowledge of how crops grown in small amounts is rather limited, in my opinion. Are there any Jamaican allspice farmers out there who could help?--ChrisJMoor 01:39, 4 May 2005 (UTC)

I think that statement needs a citation to back it up. Looking at the scoville scale page, I see pimento listed as 100-500 SHU, but in that case it's talking about the pepper used to stuff olives, not the spice also called allspice. 68.227.185.194 02:20, 10 December 2006 (UTC)

I've never thought of allspice as being hot. And I'm pretty sensitive to heat. Is cinnamon considered to be hot? I'd guess allspice to be similar to cinnamon, although I have no idea how these things are measured. In any case, I see a solicitation to cultivation information here. I've not farmed allspice myself. However, I grew up in San Cristobal, Alta Verapaz, where allspice is a major crop, so I updated the article slightly. In my Guatemalan home town, allspice trees are about as tall as any other canopy tree, I'd say at least 10 meters, although I don't have any reference to back that up. I certainly think characterizing it as a small tree is absurd. The allspice trees serve two main functions. The primary function is to provide shade for the coffee trees, which can't tolerate full sunlight. It takes a long time for the trees to achieve this size, so they are generally planted by one generation for the next generation (of people) to harvest the fruit. The fruit grow in clusters and are picked by hand. Men climb up the trees with long poles to knock the clusters down from the trees. The clusters are gathered and the fruit dried on mats in the street along with the coffee beans. Victor Engel (talk) 00:02, 6 August 2010 (UTC)

Allspice translations[edit]

Does anyone know where on the internet I can find the translation for "ALLSPICE" in other languages?--Kataquaz (talk) 07:34, 11 July 2008 (UTC)

Try clicking on the links on the bottom left side of the article. They'll take you to the equivalent page in other languages, with the name translated of course. If that's not enough, try searching for the latin name (Pimenta dioica) with search results limited to language you're looking for. DBlomgren (talk) 05:36, 20 July 2008 (UTC)

It is called 'ziele angielskie" in Polish, which translates as "the english herb" or "the english spice" 95.40.199.156 (talk) 22:06, 23 October 2010 (UTC)

Removed the translation for Urdu " كباب چيني (Kabab Cheeni, 'kebab sugar')" cause it refers to Cubeb (Piper cubeba). Burman (talk) 11:46, 5 May 2009 (UTC)purple monkey dish washer

Picture[edit]

A picture of the grown tree/shrub would help the perspective of the article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.6.239.73 (talk) 22:49, 15 November 2011 (UTC)

References[edit]

I've just been through the article and reformatted the references - I think the referencing, at least, should pass as B-class now, if anyone would care to check it. While I was there, I removed this one, because it didn;t seem to be used in the text.[1] I thought I'd preserve it here in case it's useful. GyroMagician (talk) 20:23, 12 December 2009 (UTC)

Is this the origin of the current ref no 1? It is currently a footnote, not a reference and does not cite a source for the information.

Incidentally, I can only see the text for your reference while in edit. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 85.210.170.34 (talk) 19:03, 10 August 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ Stobart, Tom (25 August 1977). Herbs, Spices and Flavourings. Penguin Books. ISBN 0140462619.