Talk:American election campaigns in the 19th century

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Untitled[edit]

I added an entirely new article on 19th century election campaigns, a topic not elsewhere covered but which has a very large literature. Richard Jensen 67.176.74.236 06:01, 11 November 2005 (UTC)

I don't understand what this means:[edit]

"(Slaves became free in 1863-65 and could vote between about 1870 and 1900.)"

I'm just a passerby doing a little research for history and I noticed this. Was there some reason that kept african americans from voting all of a sudden in 1900? Of course I understand there were things like threats of violence but was their constitutional right to vote taken away or something? The way it's worded is a little unclear to me, but I left it as is so that you experienced wikipedia editors can fix it if it needs to be. Just putting in my two cents (sorry if I just overlooked something and pointing this out was totally unnecessary).

During the Jim Crow era, starting about 1890, most southern states effectively prevented 90%+ of the blacks from voting. This lasted until 1964. Rjensen (talk) 05:41, 28 April 2010 (UTC)

18th Admenment[edit]

I just want to know about the people that I in their realigion it said that they have to drink. like for example, if in my realigion it said that I have to drink but the 18th Admenment said I can't then I don't know what to do. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 24.193.15.224 (talk) 00:07, 2 March 2007 (UTC).

there were religious exemptions--communion wine was allowed. Rjensen (talk) 05:41, 28 April 2010 (UTC)