Talk:American wire gauge

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Fusing current[edit]

I'm a little unhappy including a list of "fusing current" values here. It's highly material and geometry dependent; the fusing current of a bit of wire depends on many factors other than the wire's inherent diameter, and those fusing values should come with a whole article worth of explanations and limitations. --Wtshymanski (talk) 20:25, 12 January 2011 (UTC)

Well the editor has specified copper as the material. At one time, fuse boards really did consist of bits of copper wire and there was an accepted correspondence between diameter and fusing current. I see no fundamental objection to Wikipedia containing this information, even if the reality is more complicated, provided it is sourced, which it is. What I would say is that this is not really directly relevant to the AWG article; fuse (electrical) would be a more appropriate place. SpinningSpark 19:54, 18 January 2011 (UTC)
I'm not sure how useful (a.k.a. notable) the information is, but the entire table is talking about cylindrical copper wire, so I really think that complaint is a red herring. And the fusing current, especially for small time intervals, actually doesn't depend too much on the environment because there isn't time for much heat transfer. What I would like to see on the talk page, or a footnote, are the actual formulas used. 71.41.210.146 (talk) 01:14, 24 March 2011 (UTC)

I was using the fusing current equations referenced in [8] and [9] for a nonstandard wire size and discovered that the original author of the Fusing Current portion of the AWG table omitted the "+1" term from the Onderdonk fusing current equation. The correct equation is, for Tmelt=1084.62 for copper and Tambient=25C, Ifuse = AREAcircularmils * SQRT( LOG( (TmeltC-TambientC) / (234-TambientC) +1) /(Tseconds * 33) ). This caused a 5% systematic error, which is less than the rounding error in some instances, but I wanted to at least get the table to correspond with the referenced equations. I kept values to at least two significant figures, but didn't restrict larger numbers to the same precision. (This is my first Wikipedia edit (yaaay) so I hope I didn't muck up the table format!) Wikiguinne (talk) 22:33, 29 May 2014 (UTC)

Looks good to me. The preview button is your friend if you want to avoid messing up anything. SpinningSpark 23:55, 29 May 2014 (UTC)

MegaOhms per meter?[edit]

The table displays Ohms/km or MegaOhms/m. This should be the other way around: Ohm/m (or MOhm/1000km which should just be removed) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.98.233.229 (talk) 02:43, 1 December 2013 (UTC)

It's mΩ/m, lowercase m, that is, milliohms per metre, not MΩ/m, megaohms per metre. SpinningSpark 09:15, 1 December 2013 (UTC)

nonferrous[edit]

this may be part of the std, but as a practical matter, isn't a lot of zipcord and other awg stuff made of iron containing metals ? thanks — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.195.10.169 (talk) 16:43, 4 March 2014 (UTC)

As far as I know, zip-cord does not commonly contain iron. What applications are you thinking of? Perhaps you are confused with zip-line (which isn't normally sized by AWG). In any case AWG sizes are the same regardless of the cable material so that is not really relevant. SpinningSpark 18:32, 4 March 2014 (UTC)

voltage drops[edit]

This article would be more helpful to the general reader if it contained some building wiring voltage drops for typical max circuit amps on typical AWGs for reference lengths, such as 15A on 14AWG 100ft solid, and 15A on 16AWG 50ft ext cord. Until then, a link to something like this would help... -71.174.178.251 (talk) 02:40, 10 June 2014 (UTC)

  • www.calculator.net/voltage-drop-calculator.html?material=copper&wiresize=8.286&voltage=120&phase=ac&noofconductor=1&distance=100&distanceunit=feet&amperes=15&x=61&y=9