Talk:Analog recording

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Untitled[edit]

"One of the drawback of analog recordings was the poor fidelity." Not the best analog recordings, right?

Removed POV paragraph[edit]

I removed the following paragraph (even though I agree with its basic premise), because it needs some citation before it can be considered NPOV.

A perceived drawback of many analog recordings was noise of the media, or of the equipment, and of production equipment limitations. Repeat playing of a gramophone record introduces wear that made the original recording more difficult to hear over the noise level. Careful removal of dirt is helpful; as is careful handling.

\sim Lenoxus " * " 20:08, 28 April 2008 (UTC)

Verification problems[edit]

References in the lead indicated that Thomas Edison invented the phonograph and the Lumiere Brothers hosted the first public movie screening. These facts are different that what is claimed in the article text, first recording (see Phonautograph) and first film (note that Lumiere Brothers makes no such claim) respectively. I have tagged these issues. --Kvng (talk) 14:24, 3 January 2011 (UTC)

Phonograph vs. Gramophone[edit]

Both topics are covered by the same article (Phonograph) on Wikipedia. Here we give the impression that they're distinctly different mediums. I think the two sections in this article should be combined in this article. -—Kvng 16:49, 3 March 2013 (UTC)

Scope?[edit]

I think the article concentrates too heavily on the history of analog recording and does not give a view of the general principle: in particular the following issues deserve discussion:-

  • Technique common to all analog recording, e.g. setting the record level, mastering, avoiding copies of copies
  • Recording sources other than sound, i.e. video, electric potentials, sunlight (heliography)
  • Recording on human-readable media, e.g. barographs, seismographs, EKG
  • Optical recordings, as in motion picture soundtracks and some speaking clocks
  • Telephone recordings: automated announcements, answering machines, call recording, wiretapping
  • Links to musique concrète and the electronic musical styles enabled by recording technology

Just a few thoughts, comments welcome. re/greg/ex;{mbox|history} 21:58, 20 June 2013 (UTC)

"No physical contact between the recording/playback head and the tape itself."[edit]

"Another huge advantage of the electromagnetic recording process in general was the fact that there was no physical contact between the recording/playback head and the tape itself."
I wonder if the person who wrote that had ever seen a magnetic tape recorder in operation... Because if he had, he would surely have remarked that the heads touch the tape. And I don't see how it could be otherwise. Hébus (talk) 04:40, 7 December 2013 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done. You are correct. I got rid of that bit. Binksternet (talk) 05:11, 7 December 2013 (UTC)