Talk:Anthem (novella)

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Jennifer Aniston on Friends reading Anthem[edit]

I know this is somewhat original research, but the book Jennifer Aniston's character "Rachel" is reading is not "Anthem" by Ayn Rand, but "Anthem: an American Road Story" by Shainee Gabel and Kristin Hahn. I'll link to a a picture of the cover below. By viewing the episodes in question in Season 4 of Friends, one should be able to easily see that the cover of the book Rachel is reading matches the cover to the Gabel/Hahn book: http://www.amazon.com/Anthem-Shainee-Gabel/dp/0380974193

While I know this is original research on my part, it is likewise original research to assume that the "Anthem" that Rachel is reading is Ayn Rand's without any confirmation from an official source. Based on this, and the existence of a separate, verifiable, non-Rand "Anthem" whose cover matches what's in the show, I'm going to remove the reference to "Friends" from this article. If there's a problem with that, we can discuss it here. Dexeron (talk) 16:38, 15 June 2010 (UTC)

The Anthem Formula[edit]

On Boing-Boing, Owen noted:

Here’s the formula for [Anthem]:

  1. Take an obvious thing that everyone understands and that’s integral to human culture. (In Anthem, this is individuality.)
  2. Posit a distant future where everyone has forgotten it.
  3. Have your main character rediscover or reinvent it.
It’s a novella opposing an idea that no one has suggested and that could not happen.

I have nothing to add to Owen’s observation.  Mr JM  15:32, 7 February 2011 (UTC)

Message[edit]

Nobody supports "Big Brother" or Darth Vader either, nor does anyone (except possibly Ayn Rand, depending on how you look at it) advocate the philosophy of Ebenezer Scrooge. Anthem is a warning about where ideas could go, not where they are now. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.193.112.62 (talk) 00:08, 30 March 2011 (UTC)

This article says Rand contrasts socialist values with capitalist values, but isn't that somewhat innacurate? My understanding is that Rand sees rational individualism as the root of all "values" and collectivist ideology as "nonvalue" —Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.193.112.62 (talk) 00:03, 30 March 2011 (UTC)