Talk:Anthem for Doomed Youth

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WikiProject Poetry (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
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I think the poem is about the futility of war

The title shows this very clearly


Great title, isn't it?

cattle?[edit]

Cattle- as a word, isn't onomatopoeia. The definition of onomatopoeia is that the word expresses the essence of the sound that it is describing, ie, 'ping', 'bang' etc. Cattle rhymes with rattle. It isn't onomatopoeia, so I've amended the article. Titanium geek 05:08, 12 April 2007 (UTC)


magnificent poetry from our beloved Wilfred

10,000 Maniacs[edit]

i dno Does anyone else find the 10,000 maniacs reference banal and slightly offensive? Wikipedia has a lot of these links between established, well-respected works and derivative works in popular culture. I think in this case it is not a notable link, unless a few more similar ones can be found to form a "References in popular culture and derivative works" section.

what's the new coming?[edit]

this is one of the poem that makes the youth of today think hard about their future. please write us some many poems about wars cause it really make us interesting in it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 202.134.25.147 (talk) 20:20, 6 March 2008 (UTC)

Derivative works[edit]

Would link to Wikipedia article on Benjamin Britten's War Requiem be appropriate. [1] —Preceding unsigned comment added by 193.184.64.242 (talk) 10:14, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

About this page[edit]

I believe it to be of the highest sorrow that this page is in the state it is in.

Firstly, thank wiki for the actual existence of Project Poetry and what it stands for. However - in regards to what this page is - it is disgraceful to the institution of poetry. Think of it, a major poem in the history of WWI which has been nearly lost on the web. To ask a random individual on the street about this poem is to ask nothing. Hardly an individual would recognize the name nor the author and if read, they likely would no understand it's meaning. Just as many individuals would not have a clear understanding of WWI.

As of this moment the priorities of man are skewed. How can a world faced with the tragedy of war and the inevitable possibility of this occurring for the rest of time and have important pieces like Wilfred Owen's work simply placed on the back burner? The public mindset is a sickness and soon someone will suffer for the ignorance.

Why, might you ask, write something of this nature now and post it here? This is a plea to the general public, the users of this site and their families. Stay educated and work to not loose something as precious as history. It may seem that because poetry and information is such a public use that one should not worry that it is fading - but it is more important than ever. Individuals do not receive their information from books and three year pre-term papers of high acclaimed scholars and rarely such in school. The main resource at the moment is the internet, including on a mass part Wikipedia. Something of this nature should not be kept in such sad state. If the future generations are meant to hold this information and to carry it on then something needs to change. Because the way in which people obtain information is likely not to change any time soon than it becomes imperative to keep the asset without blemishes and full.

Think of this site and what is on the poem. Is it enough? Do you understand the poem or know where to get it and what it is regarding? So little people have commented it's a wonder that anyone thought so at all. Of all remember, poetry does have a purpose and it is irrevocably necessary. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 184.96.8.37 (talk) 01:11, 23 October 2010 (UTC)