Talk:Anti-Catholicism in literature and media

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Catholicism  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Catholicism, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Catholicism related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
 
WikiProject Literature (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Literature, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Literature on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Catholic League[edit]

The following sentence looks non-NPOV: One group that has systematically addressed anti-Catholicism is the Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights which has organized protests and issued press releases over pop culture entertainment offerings and high-profile media events. Looking at Catholic League (U.S.) it can be seen that the organisation is the subject of controversy, particularly in the section Catholic_League_(U.S.)#Irish_Child_Abuse_Commission where William Donohue is quoted as making very serious allegations about the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse (or Ryan Commission as it's popularly known in Ireland). Certainly this particular case seems less an instance of being systematic than just denying the seriousness of the allegations. Autarch (talk) 19:40, 18 October 2009 (UTC)

Modern polemics[edit]

The first quote goes back to 1852, yet there's no mention of, say Ian Paisley, a more recent example. Autarch (talk) 19:45, 18 October 2009 (UTC)

Generally not a very NPOV; needs revisions[edit]

This article seems slanted towards making the Catholic Church appear benevolent, and portraying criticisms of the Catholic Church as 'anti-Catholic'. And there doesn't seem to be any attempt to distinguish putative negative stereotypes in literature and media from legitimate expressions of people's experiences of the church, and its conduct throughout history, or simple satire (indeed the Satire & Humor section indicates that satirizing the Catholic Church is anti-Catholic). If 'anti-Catholicism' is meant to include any portrayal, satire, or criticism of the Catholic Church which some Catholics find objectionable (which seems to be the operative definition here), then this should be made clear at the beginning of the page (though this isn't the definition given on the page for Anti-Catholicism); if not, then this page needs significant revisions.

For example, in the Cinema section it's indicated that Luis Bunuel is anti-Catholic because he is "a fierce critic of what he saw as the pretension and hypocrisy of the Catholic Church." The section goes on to say the Church tried to destroy all the copies of his movie Viridia, a movie about a "well-meaning young nun [who] tries unsuccessfully to help the poor" (cited as an example of his anti-Catholicism). Relevant context here might be that the Spanish Catholic hierarchy strongly supported the brutal military dictatorship of Franco in Spain, whose rise to power lead to Bunuel fleeing the country. There are other examples throughout the article too (e.g. in the Gender & Sexuality section it's indicated that depicting a nun who voices "a feminist consciousness and a rejection of their subordinated social role", and those who criticize the Church for its stances on birth control, sexuality, and abortion, are anti-Catholic). — Preceding unsigned comment added by Polytopic (talkcontribs) 15:28, 19 May 2012 (UTC)