Talk:Antoninus of Florence

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Remains[edit]

Back in May, 2001 I was in Florence... is it possible I took a picture of the body of Sant Antonius? I have a picture of what looks like a preserved body... and a sign indicating St. Antonin (1389-1459).

Is this a catholic/christian custom? Or was the thing I took a picture of - just a manequin meant to symbolize the saint?

I would say that most likely it was the body of Saint Antoninus. It does happen, from time to time, that the body of a Saint remains remarkably well-preserved after death -- these saints are usually referred to as the "incorruptibles". I didn't realize that Antoninus was one, but it isn't out of the realm of possibility. Pastordavid 18:08, 22 January 2007 (UTC)

Question on dates and publications[edit]

Lived: March 1, 1389-May 2, 1459

Of his various works, the list of which is given in Quétif-Echard, De Scriptoribus Ord. Praedicat., i. 818, the best-known are his Summa theologica (Venice, 1477; Verona, 1740) and the Summa confessionalis (Mondovi, 1472),

Were the works published posthumously? If so, why? If not, are these the oldest extant editions? Do we know dates of publication of first editions? —Preceding unsigned comment added by The.helping.people.tick (talkcontribs) 17:03, 6 December 2007 (UTC)

Printing was barely invented in his lifetime. As with many of his contemporaries and all earlier authors, his works originated and were first circulated in manuscript. Printed editions followed. These quoted dates appear to be the first printed editions of the works in question; the Latin version of the page gives a fuller list. John M Brear (talk) 00:06, 3 June 2014 (UTC)