Talk:Aphasiology

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English -> Swedish via Stroke[edit]

Hey, I've heard about a case involving a woman who was bought up in Sweden speaking fluent Swedish and then moved to the US and learnt American. She forgot all her Swedish over time and then in her 60s had a stroke. After the stroke she could only speak Swedish and not English. Does anyone have a reference for this, if so, please paste it here :) Thanks, - 139.222.214.183 13:19, 8 November 2005 (UTC)

== An error

The simplest example is sentences in the passive voice, such as "The boy was chased by the girl." Broca's aphasics may have quite a hard time realizing that the girl is doing the chasing, but they do much better with "The mouse was chased by the cat," where world knowledge constraints contribute to the correct interpretation. However, "The cat was chased by the mouse" would likewise be incomprehensible. This evidence suggests that grammatical competence may be a specific function of Broca's area.

The above is actually incorrect to the extent of my knowledge. Broca's aphasics perform at chance for cases with both improbable and neutrally-probable sentences. For example, they are equally-likely to ascribe chasing to the cat or mouse in the case where the mouse chases the cat; world-knowledge does not motivate them to prefer the cat chasing the mouse. I'm thinking of independent studies I've read by Zurif and Grodzinsky. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.36.66.142 (talk) 02:10, 11 December 2007 (UTC)

Major cleanup[edit]

This article is almost all about Broca's area, not aphasiology in general; needs to be totally rewritten. I am currently involved in some other projects but I might take a stab at it when I'm free. Politizer talk/contribs 14:25, 25 January 2009 (UTC)

This article should probably be combined with the article on Aphasia. This article comments primarily on Broca's area and does not discuss the study of aphasia. M.C.LeRoy 6 March 2012 —Preceding undated comment added 20:16, 6 March 2012 (UTC).